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Thread: Wiring Welder

  1. #1

    Default Wiring Welder

    Ive got a 230V 20amp Mig welder I have wired to a 3 prong 230 VAC plug. Ive moved houses and dont have access to a 3 prong outlet anymore, only a 30 amp 4 prong dryer outlet. Ive been doing soem reseach and I dont think Ill have any issues with overloading the circut but I need to fidn the correct way to wire it

    Welder (as per the manual):
    Black: Hot
    White: Neutral
    Green: Ground


    4 Prong Plug:
    1 Ground, 1 Neutral, 2 Hot (correct?)

    ive read that u can wire the black and white to the two hot legs of the 4 prong and ground to ground. any ideas?

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  2. #2

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    id make sure your dryer is 230v before you go ****** rigging your welder to it and blow shit up.

    i thought most dyers were like 220 or 240v
    Last edited by Neutered Kittah; 03-04-2009 at 04:47 AM.

  3. #3

    Default

    That's all the same. No big dif between 220-280. All this implies is the amount of voltage that will be drawn through that outlet.

    I don't think you want to run your neutral to a hot leg, that would be bad. You just need to leave the one hot leg out. Make sure you wire it according to the manual though, otherwise you will end up reversing your polarity on the welder and making a nasty mess next time you try to weld something.

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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meph

    Welder (as per the manual):
    Black: Hot
    White: Neutral
    Green: Ground


    4 Prong Plug:
    1 Ground, 1 Neutral, 2 Hot (correct?)

    ive read that u can wire the black and white to the two hot legs of the 4 prong and ground to ground. any ideas?
    you do not want to wire the black and white together dude. think of thoes as comming and going feeds. Hot line brings in teh juice, neutral takes it back out.


    also.. the 4 wires on a dryer plug are...

    220v (or whatever voltage you are using, 208, 230, 280)
    120v (for the buzzer)
    neutral (shared for both 120 and 220v)
    ground (self explanatory)


    about plugging it in. still check your dryer voltage. If its higher then 230v, i prob would not plug it in. but if its 220 you might be ok

  5. #5

    Default

    from my research, correct me if im wrong:
    3 pronge -> 4 pronge

    black = black
    white = red---- (remember to mark white wire as hot)
    green = ground
    ----- = nuetral-----> connect with ground

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  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zen
    from my research, correct me if im wrong:
    3 pronge -> 4 pronge

    black = black
    white = red---- (remember to mark white wire as hot)
    green = ground
    ----- = nuetral-----> connect with ground
    Not really - the ground is tied to the neutral ONLY in the main breaker box - never anywhere else - as to do so in an appliance would be against electrical code for a very good reason - safety. The reason here is that generally the chassis of any appliance is connected to the ground lead. If the AC neutral (better called return) is connected to the chassis in the appliance, the chassis could be "connected" to up to 110 VAC if something happened to "open" the neutral connection to the main panel.

    The poster above had it right - the reason the dryer has four prongs is that it uses both 220V and 110V. 220V for the high power heating elements and 110V for electronics, lights, buzzers, etc.

    So you have TWO "hot" wires - generally designated as "X" and "Y", a neutral, and a ground. Just for info - the color code is red and black (sometimes red and blue for industrial applications) for the two "hot" wires, white for neutral, and green for ground.

    You want to wire your 220V welder with three wires to the two "hot" leads and ground - forget about the neutral. The surest way to know which prongs to use would be to get a voltmeter and measure across the prongs - only two will measure 220V. The ground is always the prong with the different shape from the others.

    I had to wire my garage for 220V for my compressor - I used a NEMA L6-30 twist lock plug and receptacle for this. These are rather "pricey" - so you could just make a "cheater cord" to go directly to the dryer outlet if you don't want to wire to the breaker box.
    Last edited by klapa; 12-12-2009 at 12:26 PM.

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