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Celiboy
06-25-2005, 11:33 AM
Does anyone know if the 6th Gen Coilovers work in the 5th Gen????? If not, I will be finding out shortly cuz I have a set already.

CandianCelicaGT
06-25-2005, 04:02 PM
coilovers = bad (unless they are Tein)

Celiboy
06-25-2005, 05:38 PM
coilovers = bad (unless they are Tein)
Yeah.... I know, But this car needs to be lower!!!

MoralWarfare
06-25-2005, 05:48 PM
coilovers = bad (unless they are Tein)
uhhh.... why?

Celiboy
06-25-2005, 06:28 PM
Anything that costs less than a boob job must suck

bloodredgt
06-25-2005, 07:20 PM
coilovers will rattle old cars to pieces...

go with lowering springs + shocks combo

Celiboy
06-25-2005, 10:21 PM
Again

I will be finding out shortly cuz I have a set already.

CandianCelicaGT
06-26-2005, 04:12 AM
think about this if you will...

ever look at the oem springs ?

Then look at the coilvers springs

Notice anything ?

Thats right, they're NOT made for our cars, the rate is way too stiff and the spring is waay too small

Celiboy
06-27-2005, 08:20 AM
bump

COLDAX
06-27-2005, 01:17 PM
I asked TEIN about this last year, and here is their reply:

COLDAX,

We currently have a Type HA for your vehicle (st185), however it will need to be special ordered from TEIN Japan. Part number is DST18-K1SS1. MSRP $1550.00.

As far as using the st205 chassis application, we would not recommend it. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact us. Thank you.

Best regards,

Sales

Staff @ TEIN USA INC.

9798 Firestone Blvd.

Downey, CA 90241

Phone: (562)861-9161

Fax: (562)861-9171

www.tein.com (http://www.celicatech.com/forums/www.tein.com)

alltracman78
06-27-2005, 01:43 PM
Keep in mind tho, the ST205 has superstrut, not regular macpherson strut.

Adrian Avgerinos
06-27-2005, 03:35 PM
coilovers = bad (unless they are Tein)

Not necessarily. It depends on what you want out of your suspension. For a street car just about anything will work. All aftermarket coilover kits will be more uncomfortable than the stock setup.

When you get into racing, or open track events, then you can start looking at the distinguishing features of each coilover brands to see which ones are serious and which coilover kits are for show. IMHO, Tein suspension is overpriced for the performance.

Gairloch
06-27-2005, 04:13 PM
All aftermarket coilover kits will be more uncomfortable than the stock setup.


I haven't checked to see if they're available for Celica's, but a buddy of mine with an Evo 8 runs on Zeal coilovers and they're even more comfortable than stock struts. They also minimize the body roll to just about nil and set up properly provide incredibly neutral handling. They're hideously expensive, but IMO having seen the before and after (he used to have JICs) they're worth every penny.

As I said I'm not sure if Zeal makes a coilover for the Celica or not, but I know JIC does.

If you use your car for road racing at all and can afford 'em coilovers are definetly the way to go. If you just wanna drop your car then finding a spring/strut combo will result in fewer headaches in the long run.

3sgte@daspeedof
08-13-2005, 01:27 AM
is it possible to use coilovers with a set of lowering springs? Ground control makes a set for our cars, and they use eibach springs.

spoolin_gt
08-13-2005, 01:44 AM
you guys are probably talking about the coilover sleeves...if you get the full coilovers..it will probably the best mod that you do for your car..full coilovers come with nice shocks and struts..and also a nice set of springs with proper spring rate..

Adrian Avgerinos
08-13-2005, 02:58 AM
is it possible to use coilovers with a set of lowering springs? Ground control makes a set for our cars, and they use eibach springs.

I think you may be confused on how this all works. A set of "lowering springs" are typically defined as a set of springs designed to replace stock springs and use the stock spring perch on the strut. In other words, they look the same as the stock springs, just shorter and slightly stiffer.

A "coilover" is another slang term usually defined to be a strut that has an adjustable perch. This means that the ride height can be adjusted by moving the spring perch up and down the strut housing. In reality, the MacPherson strut suspension our Celica's utilize have "coilovers." since the spring technically sits OVER the strut.

Ground Control sell what they call a "coilover kit." This kit includes a sleeve with an adjustable perch and a new set of springs to sit on this perch. The perch is much smaller than the original perch, and thus the spring diameter is also much smaller than stock. The springs can be purchased in a variety of lengths and rates ranging from 275 to over 1000 lb/in. The springs they supply are made by Eibach and are marketed as "Eibach Race Springs", or ERS.

These springs are linear, as opposed to the stock ones which are progressive. What this means as that the spring rate on the stock (and most "lowering springs"), increases as you increase compress the spring. For example, a linear spring that is rated at 200 lb/in would require 200 lbs of force to compress 1 inch. If you compressed it 2 inches, it would require 400lbs of force. Alternatively a progressive might only require 100 lbs of force to compress it 1 inch, but require not 200, but 300 lbs of force to compress it 2 inches. Make sense?

High performance suspensions typically utilize linear springs since it produces more consistent results.

"True coilovers" simply means you are buying a complete strut that has an adjustable perch built into the design so the adaptation of a sleeve kit like the one from Ground Control is not needed. It's an idiotic definition implying that the Ground Control product is somehow inferior.

The short answer to your inquiry : No, race springs have a different diameter than progressive lowering springs.


I haven't checked to see if they're available for Celica's, but a buddy of mine with an Evo 8 runs on Zeal coilovers and they're even more comfortable than stock struts. They also minimize the body roll to just about nil and set up properly provide incredibly neutral handling. They're hideously expensive, but IMO having seen the before and after (he used to have JICs) they're worth every penny.

As I said I'm not sure if Zeal makes a coilover for the Celica or not, but I know JIC does.

If you use your car for road racing at all and can afford 'em coilovers are definetly the way to go. If you just wanna drop your car then finding a spring/strut combo will result in fewer headaches in the long run.

Comfortable is a relative term so I won’t dispute your opinion. However, I can say with conviction that JIC strut products are crap as proven by the shock dynos I’ve seen.


you guys are probably talking about the coilover sleeves...if you get the full coilovers..it will probably the best mod that you do for your car..full coilovers come with nice shocks and struts..and also a nice set of springs with proper spring rate..

Not always. Just about any coilover kit with pretty shiny parts out of Japan that costs under $2000 is a waste of money, IMO. You could get better performance with a set of KONI Yellows and a kit from Ground Control. Oh, and a strut IS a type of shock. Also, don’t get too comfortable assuming those mad tyte JDM coilovers are using “proper” spring rates since it varies from car to car and person to person.

TEAMFaint
08-13-2005, 03:47 AM
How about does anyone wanna answer this guys question:

Will 6th Gen Coilovers work on a ST18X. I know the lowering springs too, and I've seen many coilovers that work for the 90-99 so I'm going to have to say. Yes