PDA

View Full Version : Caring for New Paint



Arcias
06-01-2005, 05:45 AM
My paint job should be done soon and I want to take really good care of it, since it basically cost me half the money I'm going to make this summer...

Any tips? Should I wax it as soon as I get it back? Also, I don't have a garage so it's outside in the elements all the time...does this mean I have to wash/wax more often?

Galcobar
06-01-2005, 07:38 AM
No, do not wax immediately. Aftermarket paint jobs, unless the car has been stripped down to the frame, have not been baked to the same extent as factory jobs. As a result, they aren't fully cured, and truth be told, most won't for a good month depending on the temperature.

It is also very soft, so be extra gentle. No sponges -- they trap dirt on the surface and drag it instead of picking it up. Get a genuine lambswool mitt, use lots of soap and water and rinse before and after. Use a two-bucket system or rinse the sponge before soaping it up again.

Until it's cured, your best bet for beauty and preservation is a good polish. These contain oils which nourish the paint and protect it somewhat, while allowing it to breath. Something like Meguiar's #81 Bodyshop Hand Polish is what you're looking for -- no abrasives.

After it's fully cured, yes, waxing and proper washing is recommended more often for cars stored outside. Pick up a good wax -- carnauba, acrylic or polymer doesn't really matter as long as it's quality. It won't be cheap, but it's a lot less expensive than a new paint job.

How you apply these products is just as important, if not more so. My best suggestion: visit autopia.org. It's a car detailing website with a lot of good learning articles and reams of threads. You'll probably never have to ask a question -- just search.

As a tip, Meguiar's sells directly to consumers at good prices, and if you buy a decent amount, often waives shipping. They waived shipping to me in Canada when I bought $100 worth of products, foam pads and cloths.

Blackcloud
06-05-2005, 08:18 AM
autopia.org looks like a great site.

Arcias
06-05-2005, 10:08 AM
Indeed it does. A lot of good info, though it was kinda hard to find stuff on a basic wash. Great stuff on more advance areas of detailing though.

Galcobar
06-05-2005, 11:01 AM
autopia.org looks like a great site.

Yes! A convert!


Arcias:
Try this article on autopia -- http://articles.autopia.org/index.php?page=index_v2&id=35&c=16 -- "Washing and Drying"

RallyK
06-06-2005, 06:23 PM
No, do not wax immediately. Aftermarket paint jobs, unless the car has been stripped down to the frame, have not been baked to the same extent as factory jobs. As a result, they aren't fully cured, and truth be told, most won't for a good month depending on the temperature.

It is also very soft, so be extra gentle. No sponges -- they trap dirt on the surface and drag it instead of picking it up. Get a genuine lambswool mitt, use lots of soap and water and rinse before and after. Use a two-bucket system or rinse the sponge before soaping it up again.

Until it's cured, your best bet for beauty and preservation is a good polish. These contain oils which nourish the paint and protect it somewhat, while allowing it to breath. Something like Meguiar's #81 Bodyshop Hand Polish is what you're looking for -- no abrasives.

After it's fully cured, yes, waxing and proper washing is recommended more often for cars stored outside. Pick up a good wax -- carnauba, acrylic or polymer doesn't really matter as long as it's quality. It won't be cheap, but it's a lot less expensive than a new paint job.

How you apply these products is just as important, if not more so. My best suggestion: visit autopia.org. It's a car detailing website with a lot of good learning articles and reams of threads. You'll probably never have to ask a question -- just search.

As a tip, Meguiar's sells directly to consumers at good prices, and if you buy a decent amount, often waives shipping. They waived shipping to me in Canada when I bought $100 worth of products, foam pads and cloths.

Galcobar... you're my hero. You're an unending source of info.

I was told that I should not wax my car for a good 3 months or so after my paint job.

alltracman78
06-06-2005, 06:25 PM
The best time to get a paint job is in the middle of the summer.
The heat helps the paint cure faster. Faster it cures, harder it is.
Let the car sit in the sun as much as possible for a month or so.

AllOutRed90
06-15-2005, 05:48 AM
"Let the car sit in the sun as much as possible for a month or so."

for sum reason that doesnt sound like a good idea, but i suppose thats what you gotta do...

Galcobar
06-15-2005, 12:24 PM
Wash regularly. The benefits of a month in the sun for paint hardness outweigh the UV damage.

The no-wax timeline depends on the paint and the drying process used. Some shops spray it on and then dry it only long enough to get it dry to the touch. Others cook it for as long as the wiring can stand. Best rule is if you're not sure, polish it, don't wax it. Polish will make it look good, if that's your worry, but wax will seal it and prevent it from curing. Besides, wax isn't supposed to make paint look good, it's only supposed to keep it looking that way.

Galcobar
06-15-2005, 12:27 PM
Galcobar... you're my hero. You're an unending source of info.


Just don't ask me to tune a turbo. I know how they work, but not a clue on how to make them work.

schmooot
06-15-2005, 08:01 PM
My car just got sprayed last week, just overnight drying no heater. So I should give it a month or more in the hot sun before waxing eh? What do you recommend for a car wash soap? any good cheap ones out there or are they all the same shit different bottle (in each respective price range of course)

Galcobar
06-16-2005, 12:40 AM
Price affects quality. I follow the rule with the good quality stuff to match the wash with your shine and protection products.

I've never heard anything bad about a Mother's or Meguiar's wash. Never, ever use dish detergent. It does a great job stripping wax, but it also strips out the oils in your paint that keep it looking good -- loss of those oils is what leads to oxidation.

Good quality washes don't require a lot to do a car. I'm using the NXT Wash (my final step is NXT Wax). Meguiar's recommends an ounce per gallon. I use about half a gallon to wash my car -- but then, I rinse my mitt before sticking it back in the soapy water. The NXT wash definately does a better job of restoring the hydrophobic properties of the NXT wax than my prior wash.

While you can't wax, wash it and polish it with a non-abrasive polish by hand using a microfibre cloth (watch for ones with hard/polyester edging). You do not want to introduce any scratches if you can help it. While it's curing, be VERY careful in how you wash. Use a new lambswool mitt, clean it between dunking it in the soapy water, and use lots of soap and water for lubrication.

AllOutRed90
06-16-2005, 01:57 AM
Would you suggest the same on a high quality paint job, like a BMW per say?

Galcobar
06-16-2005, 02:24 AM
Would I suggest taking care of any multi-thousand dollar investment the same way. Yes.

Factory paint jobs and aftermarkets differ in how well they are cured before you get them. That's the only rule separating them. Paint quality and preparation is not a matter of factory or aftermarket. It's a matter of how much you're willing to pay.