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muscle_bound89@Live.com
07-27-2013, 06:55 AM
Has anyone done this with our cars?
Been told it will keep your intake clean but have to flash your ecu.

Will do FI set up on 5s.

rizin
07-27-2013, 07:40 AM
I have never heard about flashing the ecu. Yes people on here have done it.

alltracman78
07-28-2013, 04:45 AM
It won't keep your intake clean, you still have the PCV system. Not to mention it helps keep the engine from knocking during medium/low load.
Why block it off?

Murgatroy
07-30-2013, 10:29 AM
We blocked it on Chaos, I didn't notice any difference.

We didn't do crap with teh ECU, we cut a piece of aluminum to fit it, RTVed it and rolled.

joe's gt
07-31-2013, 05:01 AM
Blocking off your EGR will do nothing noticeable for performance. The dilution of your intake charge is not significant enough to cause a noticeable drop in power.

muscle_bound89@Live.com
08-08-2013, 08:11 AM
Ok so after some research. The oil catch can. Never really knew the purpose of it. But if you were to put one on could you take off the EGR valve? Since the catch can catches all the condensation and oil that goes through the EGR.

muscle_bound89@Live.com
08-08-2013, 08:13 AM
If i did this would I still pass emissions? From toyota nation i read that when you put on the catch can it will keep your exhaust from burning blue.

Hiko
08-08-2013, 10:26 PM
Catch can is supposed to keep the intake track clean from oil. But if your exhaust is blue, you've got far larger problems (bad piston rings/ valve seals) than the pcv.

As far as passing with the egr blocked, you'll fail a visual if you pull the valve itself off. For the the sniffer test, I'd *guess* you'd pass (or could at least fake it through), but why bother risking it for no performance gain?

Galcobar
08-09-2013, 11:20 PM
The point of the EGR is to reduce the temperature of your combustion chambers, thus reducing the formation of nitrogen oxides (major smog component). Not passing emissions testing is a distinct possibility due to overly high NOx without a functioning EGR.

An engine in good condition should not be blowing so much oil into the combustion chamber that it's making its way through the EGR to foul your intake, or for that matter through the PCV. As Hiko said, blue smoke is a bad sign. Beyond which, the PCV to which you'd attach the catch can is a separate system from the EGR. If anything, adding the catch can will help keep the EGR and intake cleaner -- unless I'm misunderstanding how you're proposing to use the catch can.

muscle_bound89@Live.com
08-10-2013, 07:51 AM
I think thats answers the question. using the catch can as sort of a pre filter before anything gets to the EGR valve keeping the egr and intake clean. So im assuming with a catch can you could technically do away the EGR valve but like Hiko said would fail visual inspection. ive herd people sandwichiing the block off plate in the egr so its still there but having no function.

Galcobar
08-10-2013, 09:54 AM
No, the catch can is to catch oil, reducing hydrocarbon emissions and preventing carbon/gunk buildup. The EGR is to control nitrous oxide emissions. Oil ends up in the EGR system only if it first gets run through the PCV system, the intake, the combustion chamber and then into the exhaust stream.

I'm trying to figure out why you still want to block off the EGR after everything that's been posted. You gain no performance, degrade your air quality, possibly cause engine knock, and risk failing inspection.

Is it because you're unclear on the function of the EGR? The acronym stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation; it feeds a little exhaust gas, which unlike the mixture of fresh air and fuel is inert, into the combustion chamber in order to lower the temperature of the combustion chamber. NOx forms only at high temperatures, so the EGR prevents NOx formation. The EGR system has nothing to do with oil circulation or crankcase ventilation (that's the job of the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system). If there is oil fouling the intake, it is almost certainly coming from the PCV valve or hose, and is a symptom of as Hiko said a bigger problem (valves, rings, sparkplug tubes, etc).

Shadowlife25
08-12-2013, 01:22 AM
No, the catch can is to catch oil, reducing hydrocarbon emissions and preventing carbon/gunk buildup. The EGR is to control nitrous oxide emissions. Oil ends up in the EGR system only if it first gets run through the PCV system, the intake, the combustion chamber and then into the exhaust stream.

I'm trying to figure out why you still want to block off the EGR after everything that's been posted. You gain no performance, degrade your air quality, possibly cause engine knock, and risk failing inspection.

Is it because you're unclear on the function of the EGR? The acronym stands for Exhaust Gas Recirculation; it feeds a little exhaust gas, which unlike the mixture of fresh air and fuel is inert, into the combustion chamber in order to lower the temperature of the combustion chamber. NOx forms only at high temperatures, so the EGR prevents NOx formation. The EGR system has nothing to do with oil circulation or crankcase ventilation (that's the job of the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system). If there is oil fouling the intake, it is almost certainly coming from the PCV valve or hose, and is a symptom of as Hiko said a bigger problem (valves, rings, sparkplug tubes, etc).


'Nuff said/