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85gtsblackman
05-09-2012, 07:56 AM
ive serched and ive seen threads on removing clear coat, the paint job on my 240 is not factory but a clear coat base coat, the clear i can chip off with my fingers and is missing off most of the top of the car, i did apply compound, cleaner wax and polish in an area where the clear was gone and without much effort shined right up.

is there a way i can wetsand the rest of the old clear off or something?

Galcobar
05-09-2012, 08:56 AM
Sandpaper or compound or polish, they're all abrasives (well, except for the pure polishes). Just a matter of how aggressive you're willing to get, aka how much risk of damaging the base coat you're willing to take.

Do you have a random orbital polisher or a rotary polisher? That can make much faster work, though you need different products for each, or at least products which can handle the higher heat and pressure of a rotary. If you do wetsand, you'll need to use a compound to clean the sanding marks off.

I'd be inclined to try claybaring the car and then compounding it, if there's any hope of rescuing some of the clear coat. At least try compounding first then try wetsanding -- the less damage you do to the base coat the better.

Most compounds don't finish out to reflection-smooth paint, though Meguiar's newer Ultimate Compound (hand and orbital application) and M105 Ultra Cut (rotary application) can provide a clean finish if you're good and a little lucky. Following it up with a mild corrective polish such as Ultimate Polish or M205 can give you the final sheen, and work in the polishing oils to keep the paint healthy. If you do get a clean finish out of the compound, I'd suggest a pure polish to finish instead.

And after compounding, no paint cleaner or cleaner wax required. For longevity, best to finish with a pure sealant. Carnauba will give you deep colour, while polymer and acrylic will give you greater longevity. Without a clear coat, you're going to want to pay attention to keeping a good sealant coat in place.