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View Full Version : Alarm instal, what you need to know and how you need to do it.



temperacerguy
09-27-2011, 12:58 AM
This is part one of "How to install an alarm on a 5th Gen" Part one will be all of the "Whys" It will go into great detail, and most of you ADD people will just go "OK, now tell me what to do"

Part 2 will be the step by step Hows for the Install monkeys

I will be editing this over the next few days with pictures and the like.

How to install a simple Alarm system:

The great thing about installing an alarm system these days is that the information is already out there. Fortunately/Unfortunately, chances are that you are not cool enough to have installed the first alarm on this type of car, and someone out there has already done the leg work chasing the wires you need in the harness. You can find these wires listed at various places online such as www.the12volt.com. Sites like these also have information like how relays and diodes work which you may need if you are adding features like a trunk pop solenoid.
I personally do all of my wiring installs in two or three sections. The first is the planning/prep stage. I do this while some lame TV show is on in the background in my office (or living room floor) where it’s air conditioned/heated, and my cat can play with the spare wire… The 2nd stage is installing all the peripheral items… the sensors, sirens, antennas, switches and running the wires from these to under the dash. The 3rd stage is the actual wiring… and if you did the prep-work right, this is just plugging everything in, and is very simple. This also means that you have built in breaks, where your car is still operable.
I find that if you don’t do this, you end up frustrated and sweating/freezing in an uncomfortable position under your dash with your tools and paperwork always just out of reach. Constantly moving around from under the dash, with your car in a million pieces. There’s always something that you forgot to get or need, so you have to leave your car apart while you go grab what you need borrowing someone elses car. This results in a job that you JUST WANT TO GET DONE, and your work will not be as clean/professional as it should/could be. And there’s a damn good chance your connections will be shite, resulting in a crappy alarm that works half the time if at all.


The first thing you want to do is pull out your alarm harnesses and spread them out. There will be many wires. Don’t become daunted… you will one by one knocking them out one by one. Next pull out the manual for your alarm, and the harness guide for your car and start labeling wires.
For a simple alarm, you will typically have the following wires:
• 12V constant
• 12V switched (Ignition or accessory)
• Ground
• Door Trigger
• Dome light
• Parking lights
• Starter (to motor)
• Starter (to switch)
• Ground when armed
• Siren output
• Horn output
• Aux 1-(x)Output
Now, your 95% of the time, your alarm will also have wires for door locks… Alarms are universal, so some have multiple outputs for different kinds of factory door locks. The most common is just a negative pulse signal (like we have), If your alarm’s door lock harness has two wires (both negative; one for lock, one for door lock), then just connect them as I list below. If your harness has 4 wires (positive and negative), then do not use the positive, just use the negative as I list below. If your harness has 6-8 wires, then your alarm has built in door lock relays (to be used with various Euro cars). Wire “unlock Input” and “lock input” to ground, Wire “unlock common” to the car’s unlock wire. Wire “Lock common” to the car’s lock wire. The rest are unused.
Your alarm will also have wire harnesses for your alarm’s features. These wire harnesses do not need to be cut/spliced in a simple installation, they just need to be plugged into the feature and the alarm body
• It will have a wire harness connecting to the antenna,
• It may have a wire harness for a valet switch/button
• It may have a wire harness for an LED
• It may have a harness for external sensors (such as shock sensor or glass breakage)


Now look at your wires listed at www.the12volt.com. Here’s the diagram for a 90-93 Celica
Constant 12V+ White Ignition Switch Harness
Starter Black/White Ignition Switch Harness
Ignition Blue/Red Ignition Switch Harness
Ignition 2 Black/Orange Ignition Switch Harness
Accessory Gray Ignition Switch Harness
Tach White/Blue Or Black (-) at Diagnostic Connector or Igniter
Brake Switch Green/White Brake Switch
Trunk Pin Red/White (-) Trunk Light Hatch Back Works with Dome Light
Parking Lights Dark Green Driver's Kick Panel
Head Lamp Red/Yellow (-) Steering Column
Hood Pin n/a
Factory Disarm n/a
Door Trigger Red/White (-) Driver's Kick Panel
Door Lock Blue/Black (-) Driver's Kick Panel
Door Unlock Blue (-)
Horn Wire Green (-) Steering Column


Now luckily Most Japanese vehicles like ours are all negative triggered, so it will make for an easy install.
Start to label your wires. I have a cheap Dymo label maker I picked up at walmart, but masking tape and a sharpie will accomplish the same task. Match the wires in the alarm harness to the wires listed in the body harness. I also label as to where these are in the body harness:

• Alarm Wire How it’s labeled
• 12V constant “White wire in ignition harness”
• 12V Switched “Grey in Ignition harness”
• Ground “Ground to chassis with ring terminal”
• Door Trigger “Red/White in Driver’s Kick
• Dome “Red/White in Driver’s Kick” (same wire as above)
• Parking Lights “Dark Green in Driver’s Kick”
• Power Lock “Blue/Black in Drivers Kick” (Typically in door harness)
• Power Unlock ”Blue in Driver’s Kick” (Typically in door harness)
• Starter to motor “Black/White in ignition”
• Starter to switch “Black/White in ignition”
• Ground When armed “Not used” (this is used if you want additional features to be active/triggered when the alarm is armed) I have put knight rider like LEDs on the front of a car that became active when the alarm is armed)
• Siren Output “To Siren” (see note)
• Horn Output “Not used” (see note)
• Aux 1-(x)Output “not used” (these are optional outputs to make your alarm control something with the use of relays… this can be anything from rolling your windows up, to making your lights turn on, to beltching flames out your tailpipe, anything that can be turned on with a momentary switch can be controlled with an Aux output)
(* Most modern alarm systems come with their own sirens. Either or both the Siren and horn can be used. Most people (myself included) use the siren only, However if you have a lower end alarm that did not come with a siren, or you just want to use the horn, then wire the horn output wire to Green wire in the steering column. )

Now, all the wires that are not used… Most pro installers, just tie them up and jam them up into the recesses of your dash to fall on your feet in a few years… Most Home installers just clip the wires near the harness and tape the ends. Personally, I like to pull the terminals and wires out of the plug. This way if I find out I made a mistake and needed the wire, I can put it back into the plug. Or if at a later time I realize I can use that feature, I can just put the terminal back in the plug. But most of all, it just looks professional, and at a later time when troubleshooting another problem, you won’t see a loose wire end and think that’s part of your problem.
So, it’s at this time that I remove all the wires/terminals that I do not believe I will need. To do this, using a small screwdriver or drift, just press on the retaining tang, and pull the wire out from the back of the plug.

The next stage in the alarm install is to mount the periphrials.
-Siren: The siren should always be facing down and well protected. This way water does not get ruined by water. Many people think by mounting it in the front grill that it will be more audible… My belief is that they are so loud that one can mount them anywhere under the hood and be heard by most people in your neighborhood. So choose a spot where it’s most protected by the elements. I typically mount it near the battery or fuse box. Most sirens have 2 wires… Wire the ground to the chassis, and the positive to the alarm body. (Battery backup sirens have 3-4 wires, wire positive to 12V constant, Ground to chassis, and positive input to the alarm (or negative if your wire negative trips the siren)
Shock sensor Mount it close to the center of the vehicle screwed down so all vehicle vibrations will be fully transferred to the sensor. Many people double sided tape these down, but my belief is that the tape will deaden some of the higher frequency vibrations. I mount them using self tapping screws (make sure nothing is under the place where you will be putting the screws… I know Many a MR2 owner who has drilled into the gas tank on accident) Also I recommend that you install it so that the sensor adjustments are easily reached. This will be the sensor you need to adjust over time to avoid falsing.
Valet switch . Mounted somewhere accessible, but not somewhere accidentally pressed. I typically mount these near the hood release.
Glass breakage sensor: Different manufacturers use different sensors, but they are all basically a microphone that has been tuned to listen for the high pitched sound of glass breaking. DEI has a sensor body with a remote mounted microphone. I typically mount the sensor body somewhere out of the way, then run the microphone near a crack in the dash panels. For example the small void where the steering column meets the dash.
There are many other types of sensors… Proximity, tilt (for if your car gets towed) and so on. Wire them up as per the directions included with the sensor.

The last stage is wiring it all up. Now there’s some debate as to which method is best: Here are a few with both pros and cons:

http://www.alternativecruisers.com/images/foglights/foglights_p2_015.jpg
Loop Twist and tape… This method you strip back some of the factory wire, loop the alarm wire around the exposed target wire, twist it together and tape up the connection.
• Pros: None
• Cons: It will work itself loose over time, and will just make a horrible and weak connection. DON’T DO IT!

http://www.electricalhub.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/5/5/558.jpg
Scotchlok Splice taps: These are taps where the two wires run parallel to each other, and a bridge tap cuts into both wires to make the connection.
• Pros: you can find these taps at any home improvement/hardware store/walmart. It only takes a pair of pliers to make the connection.
• Cons: They are difficult to hold/use under a dashboard. You cannot see where the tap makes contact with the wire, as such, it’s easy for the tap to cut the wire in half at best, or cut few of the strands at worst… if only few of the strands are cut, the rest can break over time severing the connection. Also, if you need to change wire connections, you need to pull this tap off and throw it away, then cover the exposed wire with tape. In my book these are only slightly better than loop twist and tape.

http://www.florida50.com/user/image/p1050111.jpg
T-taps: These are two part taps. Where the tap itself is connected to the target wire, and the alarm harness wire is in a standard insulated blade terminal.
• Pros: They are fast to use. Compact, and easy to use in small places, Can be tapped one handed. If a mistake is made (and they always are), you can leave the tap in place and the wire is still protected. You can easily plug in and unplug the blade connection. You can see that the wire is in the correct position to eliminate/reduce the chances of cutting the target wire.
• Cons: Not as easy to find locally (are available from radio shack, but expensive there. They can be ordered by the thousands cheap on E-bay), If you are sloppy, you can still cut/weaken the wire when tapping.
Soldering: Soldering is where you expose the wire of both the target wire and the alarm wire, then using a conductive solder, connect the two wires together. You then must connect the exposed wire (properly with shrink wrap, improperly with electrical tape) This method is considered the end-all-be-all by the internet forum based automotive community, however is not allowed by the FAA or branches of the military, and is frowned upon by electrical professionals of many types for the cons listed below.
• Pros: Very good electrical conductivity, solid and permanent mounting of the two copper wires
• Cons: takes a long time to do. Requires initially cutting the target wire in half (to slide the shrink wrap onto), Shortens the target wire (by the length of wire you have twist together), will loosen the bonding between the wire and the insulation (by heating the wire to solder), will weaken the copper near the solder joint, creates a stress riser at the edge of the solder joint (which is right where the copper was weakened by the heating) Difficult to do in a wiring loom. And when doing this type of connection in a wiring harness, puts the most tension stress on the weakest wires (by the shortening). Can cause the wire to break near the solder in a vibration prone environment.

The final way is the way that I would do given enough time, access to tools. And when I am building custom harnesses, this is the way I do it. I admit fully that I do not do this in alarm/stereo installs as it’s just way too time consuming and rarely if ever have access to the right tools or consumables to do this.
Tapping into the terminal: What’s done here, is the pin is removed from the factory terminal using a pin removal tool. The pin is then removed from the wire by prying the pin apart. The new wire is then twisted with the target wire, and laid into a new pin. A ratcheting crimp tool is then used to crimp the pin onto the wires and insulation. The pin is then pressed back into the terminal.
• Pros: Excellent connection. Strong as factory. Looks absolutely factory.
• Cons: Takes a while to do Requires special pin removal and crimping tool/dies. Requires terminals specific for the specific connector, difficult to do under the dash.

temperacerguy
09-27-2011, 12:59 AM
Space reserved for the step by step guide for the hook up monkeys

monkninja
04-28-2012, 03:56 AM
I hope you're okay, haha. Because you never finished doing this, you said you would be doing it soon but that was like nine months ago!

Cheers,

Kyle

temperacerguy
04-28-2012, 04:23 AM
Well, the guy who was supposed to take all the pictures on a Celica never purchased the alarm.... I have installed a few alarms since then, but never on a celica, so never had the pics to go with the install

monkninja
04-28-2012, 06:01 AM
Dang it, it would be such an awesome write up! I have been slowly working my way through installing a Viper 5701 for the last two days. I don't have any auto wiring experience at all haha so I have been looking up stuff on the12volt.com a bunch. Right now I am kind of stuck on how to do the lock/unlock, I can't figure out how to isolate which wires I am supposed to use... There are two blue/black wires and two blue wires going to the door and they all seem to have the same voltages and responses.

Anyway I will figure it out eventually, but like you said in your post it is very frustrating for first timers. Hahahaha.

monkninja
04-28-2012, 06:02 AM
Dang it, it would be such an awesome write up! I have been slowly working my way through installing a Viper 5701 for the last two days. I don't have any auto wiring experience at all haha so I have been looking up stuff on the12volt.com a bunch. Right now I am kind of stuck on how to do the lock/unlock, I can't figure out how to isolate which wires I am supposed to use... There are two blue/black wires and two blue wires going to the door and they all seem to have the same voltages and responses.

Anyway I will figure it out eventually, but like you said in your post it is very frustrating for first timers. Hahahaha.

david in germany
04-29-2012, 09:37 AM
Good start man and a great overall thread. Something I learned about a 5 gen. Most of the wires you want are in the stereo harness. :) you have a connection for lights, power and ground. If you add keyless it is a simple install as well.
If I needed to I could have a complete keyless entry with starter kill in a 5 gen in about 2 hours and I am not he fastest installer by any means. If you can hook up a stereo in a car, you can do this one very easily.

Koryu
07-09-2012, 01:12 AM
Question, i bought a keyless entry. I was looking for the blue/black wire and found there are 2 that go into a blue plug right behind the kick pannel. I spilced into one and tried the lock and it didnt, i spliced into the other and tried to lock and it didnt. What am i doing wrong? also i couldnt find the blue/green wires back there

temperacerguy
07-18-2012, 08:06 AM
Question, i bought a keyless entry. I was looking for the blue/black wire and found there are 2 that go into a blue plug right behind the kick pannel. I spilced into one and tried the lock and it didnt, i spliced into the other and tried to lock and it didnt. What am i doing wrong? also i couldnt find the blue/green wires back there

Well, it's blue, and blue/black (not blue green). It could possibly be that your keyless entry system was giving a positive pulsed signal and not a negatively pulsed signal. make sure you are using the negatively pulsed wires with the keyless entry. If your keyless entry system only gives a positive pulsed signal, you will have to use a relay to change the positive pulsed signal to a negitively pulsed signal.