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rmpinky
11-23-2010, 06:57 PM
Hey guys, wondering which calipers/disks/pads to get for replacement rear (mot failure) and front (general upgrade, non essential)

I've read the "Brake Thread" and got the general outline, OEM work fine, but Hawk are better for stopping distance, however, being in the U.K and needing to get this done a.s.a.p importing isn't really an option. Just wondering what people use on theirs if anyone has done a swap or kept OEM.... Thanks

Galcobar
11-24-2010, 01:25 AM
Toyota pads are entirely adequate for street use and competitive with aftermarket brands on price. Brembo is the most common rotor brand used, but that's as much because of their availability as anything else. Short of track use, which requires equipment able to stand up to high temperatures -- which means they're generally less effective when used on the street -- there's minimal difference in rotor brands.

Calipers are going to be either from Aisin or Denso, both of which are Toyota's OEM partners. All the after-market remanufactured calipers are OEM items with refreshed seals, pistons, clamps, etc. You could do the same for less money by purchasing rebuild kits -- even Toyota offers them.

rmpinky
11-24-2010, 09:26 PM
So overall, unless i was racing, just stick to toyota oem's? Pads and calipers? Or is the brembo "upgrade" worthwhile (again, for street driving only) Cheers

p.s Sorry if this has been covered, just getting a feel of if i should upgrade for better braking before i look into a little more oomph :)

alltracman78
11-25-2010, 05:29 AM
Short of track use, which requires equipment able to stand up to high temperatures -- which means they're generally less effective when used on the street -- there's minimal difference in rotor brands.
Not true. When they're brand new there's probably not much difference in stopping distance, though cheaper rotors tend to not be as beefy, which means more brake fade. But, cheap rotors rust much quicker, and more severe [heavier deposits]. This means a lot more rust on the edges of the contact surface of the rotor. Which means less effective braking, more rolling resistance and accelerated pad wear. Not to mention cheaper rotors are more prone to warping.

This doesn't mean you need to buy Toyota rotors. Brembo makes good ones too. I'm not really sure what's readily available to you over there so I can't give you much in the way of specific brands. You don't need to buy the most expensive ones necessarily, but super cheap is cheap for a reason.


Calipers are going to be either from Aisin or Denso, both of which are Toyota's OEM partners. All the after-market remanufactured calipers are OEM items with refreshed seals, pistons, clamps, etc. You could do the same for less money by purchasing rebuild kits -- even Toyota offers them.Rebuilt calipers have the corrision/damage removed from the piston bores and caliper slide bores. They also have new pistons and caliper slides that are usually coated with a rust preventative coating. They're going to work/last/keep from sticking longer than if you just scrape off the worst of the rust and put new seals/clips on yours. You can buy new pistons and slides, but that drives the cost up, and you still have the old bores to deal with.
Quality is just like with the rotors. Cheaper stuff is going to have lower quality coatings [if any] and parts.

You'll be just fine with Toyota parts. If the Brembos are cheaper, might as well save a few bucks and get those.
If you're talking about getting Brembo brakes that are larger than stock, nothing wrong with that either, but it's going to be more cash.
It is a good idea to upgrade your brakes before you upgrade your power.

joe's gt
11-25-2010, 06:13 AM
Toyota pads are awesome for street use. They've lasted me a long time, but a lot of that has to do with driving style. They brake extremely well on the first application, however, can't really comment on how quickly they fade because I haven't really needed to do any hard, repeated braking with them.

Galcobar
11-25-2010, 10:27 AM
Not true. When they're brand new there's probably not much difference in stopping distance, though cheaper rotors tend to not be as beefy, which means more brake fade. But, cheap rotors rust much quicker, and more severe [heavier deposits]. This means a lot more rust on the edges of the contact surface of the rotor. Which means less effective braking, more rolling resistance and accelerated pad wear. Not to mention cheaper rotors are more prone to warping.

Aye -- was speaking to performance, given that seemed to be the focus of the original poster's query. Longevity's another issue.



Rebuilt calipers have the corrision/damage removed from the piston bores and caliper slide bores. They also have new pistons and caliper slides that are usually coated with a rust preventative coating. They're going to work/last/keep from sticking longer than if you just scrape off the worst of the rust and put new seals/clips on yours. You can buy new pistons and slides, but that drives the cost up, and you still have the old bores to deal with.
Quality is just like with the rotors. Cheaper stuff is going to have lower quality coatings [if any] and parts.

I always advocate complete rebuild kits.

That said, your overall point is one I've made often: quality comes with a cost. Sadly, that cost is often unreasonably inflated, but meh, whaddya going to do?

Patrick
11-29-2010, 11:11 PM
I just upgraded my brakes, I got all four rotors replaced and all pads.

I chose to go with Roto-Tech cross-drilled and slotted rotors. For the pads i chose EBC RedStuff ceramics.

I am still breaking them in. But from how much i have used them so far, they are definatly more sensitive than the originals.

rmpinky
12-07-2010, 08:20 PM
Not true. When they're brand new there's probably not much difference in stopping distance, though cheaper rotors tend to not be as beefy, which means more brake fade. But, cheap rotors rust much quicker, and more severe [heavier deposits]. This means a lot more rust on the edges of the contact surface of the rotor. Which means less effective braking, more rolling resistance and accelerated pad wear. Not to mention cheaper rotors are more prone to warping.

This doesn't mean you need to buy Toyota rotors. Brembo makes good ones too. I'm not really sure what's readily available to you over there so I can't give you much in the way of specific brands. You don't need to buy the most expensive ones necessarily, but super cheap is cheap for a reason.

Rebuilt calipers have the corrision/damage removed from the piston bores and caliper slide bores. They also have new pistons and caliper slides that are usually coated with a rust preventative coating. They're going to work/last/keep from sticking longer than if you just scrape off the worst of the rust and put new seals/clips on yours. You can buy new pistons and slides, but that drives the cost up, and you still have the old bores to deal with.
Quality is just like with the rotors. Cheaper stuff is going to have lower quality coatings [if any] and parts.

You'll be just fine with Toyota parts. If the Brembos are cheaper, might as well save a few bucks and get those.
If you're talking about getting Brembo brakes that are larger than stock, nothing wrong with that either, but it's going to be more cash.
It is a good idea to upgrade your brakes before you upgrade your power.

Overall, you've sumed up just what i was after. Was thinking about changing the whole front braking system, and look about for either toyota own or brembo. I would use ebay (so worst come worst, i could get anything just get hit by shipping)
After spending more than i originally wanted of the exhaust (wanted a custom one in the end, instead of a cover up to just pass the m.o.t) i have decided against looking into any new brakes/disks. However, always keeping my eye out for a bargain (if there is such a thing for the cost of a car! lol)

anyway, cheers for the advice, has been taken on board, Thanks :D