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eyeball
05-04-2010, 11:33 PM
Hello,

What is the maximum size of alloys / tyres one can fit to a generation 5 n/a narrowbody celica, while keeping the diameter of the wheels stock, and keeping safe clearances to body and mechanical parts?

Murgatroy
05-05-2010, 12:28 AM
The problem runs in the front, not the rear. That is where you will be limited.

If you play around with offsets you could manipulate the width.

The popular size is 205mm tires on 7" rim. I run 215mm on a 7". This is with a 40mm offset. I found the 38mm offset to be more flush. That is what I had when I was running 205mm tires on a 7" rim. If you run smaller than a 32mm offset on a 7" wheel you will start to get contact issues with the suspension.

Joey has run wider I think, as well as an older member Ciento44, however he is no longer active.

eyeball
05-05-2010, 01:10 AM
thanks for the quick reply :)

i thought the offset worked the other way around (at least according to http://www.carbibles.com/tyre_bible_pg4.html)

what about the diameter, how high can i go, 17?

METDeath
05-05-2010, 12:15 PM
People usually run 17x7+38 or +40, because they are widely available, with a 205/40/17 or 215/40/17 tire. In the back you can run a 17x8+35. On the front a 17x8+35 wheel will stick out past the fenders and you need to swap the front fenders over wide body fenders (GTS/All-Trac/GT4). If you have a convertible there will be some modification to get the fenders to work.

Murgatroy
05-06-2010, 04:52 PM
thanks for the quick reply :)

i thought the offset worked the other way around (at least according to http://www.carbibles.com/tyre_bible_pg4.html)

what about the diameter, how high can i go, 17?

The lower the number, the more 'inset' the hub will be.

The 'offset' refers to how many millimeters the hub sets from center of the wheel. In order to calculate that you have to know the width of the wheel. A '0' offset wheel means the hub mounting point is perfectly center. On a 7" wheel this means you have ~3.5" on either side, in and out. A 40mm offset (the most common for FWD cars) means the wheels sets in 40mm closer.

In terms of muscle cars, we always used the phrase 'backspacing.' This was easier to understand for a novice. Backspacing means the space from the inside edge of the wheel to the hub mounting point. Backspacing is measured by laying the wheel on it's face, or outside edge, then taking a flat edge across the wheel, then measuring from the flat edge to the hub mounting point. For out wheel in question being 7" wide with a 40mm offset, it would have a backspacing of 5" or 127mm.

You backspacing is going to bee important for function. This is what is going to insure you will have enough clearance without contact or rubbing on your suspension.

My setup is nearly irrelevant because I have a modified suspension which makes for much more clearance. However, on a narrowbody Coupe, I am running a 17x7 wheel, with 40mm offset and 215/40/17 tires. I am lowered a couple of inches as well. I have no contact from lock to lock. METDeath above is running the same wheel and tire size combo as I am, with a modified stock style suspension, again, on a narrowbody coupe.

That combo leaves the wheel inset from the body by about half and inch on the rear and just shy of flush on the front.

You can go up to 18" on wheel diameter, but you lose too much in comfort and you don't gain any advantage. I suggest a 16" wheel plainly for comfort. A 215/45/16 will be ride more comfortable and smoother than a 17". If you do go 17", a 215/40/17 rides a tone better than the common 205/40/17.

METDeath
05-06-2010, 06:47 PM
Well, I still run the stock strut housings... that's about it, Eibach springs and Koni struts.

eyeball
05-11-2010, 10:59 PM
What about these ones: http://www.reifen-felgen-fahrwerke-spoiler.de/tuning/Alufelgen/nach-FzTyp/TOYOTA/Celica/T18-5-Loch/17-Zoll/BBS-CS-Schwarz-Poliert-5L.html Looks like the german TüV is homologating these street legal although they are 17x7.5 ET35

METDeath
05-12-2010, 01:26 AM
Should be fine, however, you will still need the wide body front fenders as the offset is what tends to cause the rubbing. +38 is about as far as you can go without rubbing issues. Those 3mm really mess you up sometimes.

Mega
06-08-2010, 02:41 PM
Don't want to thread-jack, but I'm looking for the same wheel/tire information for a 4th generation Celica drop-top.

I have been looking at reproduction Minilite wheels...

Murgatroy
06-08-2010, 10:55 PM
I have 205/40/17 tires on a 17x7 wheel with 38mm offset. The wheels and tire is flush in the front, and inset half an inch in the rear. No contact lock to lock on stock suspension. This is on my `89 GT.

Mega
06-08-2010, 11:03 PM
I have 205/40/17 tires on a 17x7 wheel with 38mm offset. The wheels and tire is flush in the front, and inset half an inch in the rear. No contact lock to lock on stock suspension. This is on my `89 GT.

Perfect! Great information.

I'm guessing that a 16" wheel would give a better ride?
This sled is a cruiser, not a racer. :biggrin:

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af96/MegaMD/Hot%20Rod%20photos/DSCN0005.jpg

Murgatroy
06-09-2010, 02:50 AM
Yes, a 16" will give more sidewall (if you are staying close to a stock overall diameter) and as such will give a smoother ride.

Mega
06-09-2010, 02:54 AM
Same 205/40 tires, only in a 16 rather than a 17?

Sorry if the questions seem basic. Tire sizes (height, diameter, and section width) make my head hurt.

Murgatroy
06-09-2010, 01:32 PM
215/45/16 would be more appropriate. Or 205/45/16.

Murgatroy
06-09-2010, 01:32 PM
215/45/16 would be more appropriate. Or 205/45/16.

Mega
06-09-2010, 01:46 PM
Awesome.

So 16x7's with a 38mm offset
and
205(or 215)/45/16 tires.

I can work with that.
Thanks!

Mega
06-09-2010, 01:46 PM
Awesome.

So 16x7's with a 38mm offset
and
205(or 215)/45/16 tires.

I can work with that.
Thanks!