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View Full Version : Brake line banjo bolts are a biatch



RedRkt01
12-28-2009, 02:49 PM
How's that alliteration for you?

I'm performing brake work on the ST162 and I can't get either of the banojo bolts to give. The one from the chassis to the hose and the one from the hose to the drum line won't budge. A couple of the hex corners are starting to round. What do I do to get these off without damaging the bolts any further? I need a good trick here people!!!

extremeskillz
12-28-2009, 05:03 PM
Vise Grip!

RedRkt01
12-28-2009, 05:04 PM
Vise Grip!

You think that's safe enough?

extremeskillz
12-28-2009, 05:08 PM
I had the same issue with rounded corners and i just used two vise grips to get the job done. And they did well. Although not the right way of course but I'm not buy a tool for this. The other option would be to redo the line with a new nut. BUt its up to you on how far you want to go with it. The vise grips worked for me and is a good option!

MrWOT
12-28-2009, 06:18 PM
I would say impact

CriScO
12-28-2009, 06:52 PM
Technically a flare wrench would be the way to go, but if they're already rounded that may not help.

For clarification, we're talking about the hard lines in the rear, correct?

RedRkt01
12-28-2009, 06:55 PM
Technically a flare wrench would be the way to go, but if they're already rounded that may not help.

For clarification, we're talking about the hard lines in the rear, correct?

Yes, hard ones in back. They aren't really rounded that much. I stopped to prevent further damage. Hence thread!

CriScO
12-28-2009, 07:11 PM
Okay, try the flare wrench then. It's basically a closed-end six point, but with one side cut out to get past the line. It grips more points on the flare fitting so there's less chance of rounding.

With that said, I rounded all four fittings on the coupe and one side of the hatchback(never had to remove the other side...) using a standard open-end 8mm. Should've started with the flare wrench in the first place. But if you do end up rounding them, vise grips work wonders in this case because of the softness of the metal. But that also means you don't want to use the lines again. Fortunately a 12" 1/8 Metric flared line only runs about $3.

A curiosity though, why do you care of their condition if you're putting on discs? It's not like that line will fit in the calliper.

RedRkt01
12-28-2009, 07:41 PM
The lines have not been removed. everything is done on that project with the exception of the removal of the lines and the reinstallation of the new lines.....

KoreanJoey
12-28-2009, 08:06 PM
Technically a flare wrench would be the way to go

x2
IE: Line wrench
http://www.dmcnews.com/Techsection/brakes/image003.jpg

RedRkt01
12-28-2009, 08:10 PM
Never used either type. What are the diffs between the two? Diffs with normal crecent wrenches?

joe's gt
12-29-2009, 08:28 AM
Line wrench FTW!!! Made my brake hose removal and install cake!

Shadowlife25
12-29-2009, 09:06 AM
Go buy line wrenches. They will save you the headache, busted knuckles and swearing when you have to buy new stuff.

RedRkt01
12-29-2009, 04:35 PM
At least one of the banjo bolts is fuct. It is on one of the hard line that runs under the rear of the car. So I guess I need to call up Toyota for a new brake line. Fucking wonderful.

RedRkt01
12-29-2009, 04:35 PM
Never used either type. What are the diffs between the two? Diffs with normal crecent wrenches?

Reiteration.

CriScO
12-29-2009, 07:30 PM
Okay, try the flare wrench then. It's basically a closed-end six point, but with one side cut out to get past the line. It grips more points on the flare fitting so there's less chance of rounding.
Reiteration. ;)

The terms "line wrench" and "flare wrench" are interchangable. One of those "the technical name(flare) makes less sense than the common name(line)" things.

RedRkt01
12-29-2009, 07:32 PM
Thanks mate.

klapa
12-29-2009, 09:03 PM
My old trick is to use a combination of penetrating oil and heat.

When I say penetrating oil what I mean is "manifold heat control valve solvent" - the best penetrating oil I have ever found - and available from about any Ford, GM, or Mopar parts counter.

I will lightly tap the stubborn bolt with a hammer and optional brass drift to loosen up the grit or rust binding the threads, and then spray the penetrating oil, finally applying heat to make the penetrating oil "boil in" the threads.

Works wonders for me - I nearly always need to do this when removing calipers on an old car for the first time.

Shadowlife25
12-29-2009, 09:57 PM
Not a good idea if you read that he is working on fuel lines though... ;)

KoreanJoey
12-31-2009, 04:32 AM
My old trick is to use a combination of penetrating oil and heat.

When I say penetrating oil what I mean is "manifold heat control valve solvent" - the best penetrating oil I have ever found - and available from about any Ford, GM, or Mopar parts counter.

I will lightly tap the stubborn bolt with a hammer and optional brass drift to loosen up the grit or rust binding the threads, and then spray the penetrating oil, finally applying heat to make the penetrating oil "boil in" the threads.

Works wonders for me - I nearly always need to do this when removing calipers on an old car for the first time.

Must suck working on cars on the east coast...

RedRkt01
01-03-2010, 02:51 AM
Great news guys! I have to buy a brand new #4 brake line! Line wrench = too late; stripped.

Tecker184
01-04-2010, 05:30 PM
i always used a pipe wrench when i rounded something off.

RedRkt01
01-04-2010, 05:47 PM
Even if I got it off with a pipe wrench I wouldn't be able to use that brake line anymore. Thus, the replacement.

KoreanJoey
01-05-2010, 06:58 AM
I bet that set you back a bit...

RedRkt01
01-05-2010, 03:03 PM
Not really....