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View Full Version : How to Pass Smog in CA (modded cars)



joe's gt
12-12-2008, 01:44 AM
So one of the new members wanted to do a 3rd gen 3sgte, so I asked him how he planned on passing smog since he lived in CA. Mario said that smog has been beat to death on other threads. I searched around and how to pass smog has been discussed previously, but an in depth discussion on smog legality has not occurred.

I just like to remind everyone who comes on here living in CA wanting to mod their car how they are gonna make it legal before they are stupid and just delve into it like I did. I think its ridiculous that the pencil pushers in the state have a right to completely prevent you from living out your automotive dreams. If your car passes tailpipe, and is putting out no more pollution than any other car of that era, then it should pass, end of story. If you can get your car down to that level, whether it be modifying timing, running different fuel and timing maps, etc., then you should be able to pass.

So that being said, I figured a thread about ways to pass or "cheat" smog in California with a highly modded car is in order.

I am not talking about simple bolt on mods that you can take on and off, I am talking about built or swapped engines with standalones, head work, internals, etc. I know there are plenty in CA and I want to know how they are registered, insured, and legal.

I know the obvious answer is build a pre-smog car. So I am looking for more along the lines of what (in others first or second hand experiences) do shops tend to check? how to get around it? what can be hidden? how to get shop hookups? can ems pass? what shops to look for when trying to smog ur car? Anything that can be done to legalize the car (registering out of state?)?

What have you done or what have others done to make their dream come true in California?

MrWOT
12-12-2008, 04:47 AM
Certain counties require smog ONLY on sale of vehicle.... ;)

joe's gt
12-12-2008, 08:02 AM
I know Rob, thats why I hate you. :)

So how does it work? Does DMV see you live in that county and therefore they don't require you to do a smog check to renew your registration? Too bad I don't have any family living in any of those counties.

What if a person in one of those counties gets pulled over and sent to a smog ref?

wizzards581
12-12-2008, 04:27 PM
i heard that smog exempt vehicles do not have to open hoods for anyone including refs, cops, etc... my cousin had a '72 celica w/ '02 s2000 motor and was sent to ref for loud exhuast, ref cant do anything nor look under the hood, by law... they jus did a db test and its right below the max so it was cleared...

legally, any motor from same manufacturer within same class engine, same yr/generation or newer can be installed. all emissions need to be installed as well for ex... all obd2 emission parts must be connected and functional... engine yr and emission has to be available in US. rb and sr20det do not have emission levels available here so no can do.

Disco Dan
12-12-2008, 05:28 PM
Seriously? Smog refs? Is this the same country I live in? I guess the only benefit to that side of the country really is the weather. Oh, except for the wildfires and earthquakes.

MrWOT
12-12-2008, 06:02 PM
*cough* PO Box *cough*

;)

joe's gt
12-12-2008, 07:54 PM
legally, any motor from same manufacturer within same class engine, same yr/generation or newer can be installed. all emissions need to be installed as well for ex... all obd2 emission parts must be connected and functional... engine yr and emission has to be available in US. rb and sr20det do not have emission levels available here so no can do.

yeah, which is why u can do gen 2 jdm 3sgte swap and swap in the emissions from USDM. However, u can't do a gen 3 swap and get away with it, and I was more thinking along lines of passing a fully internally built motor controlled by a standalone.

wizzards581
12-12-2008, 09:17 PM
fully built motor using oem parts? or race parts? i dont know if race parts can be able to pass emission sniff.

Shadowlife25
12-13-2008, 08:05 AM
Emissions Laws & Regulations – Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB)?

The EPA is a federal governmental agency that works to develop and enforce regulations that implement environmental laws enacted by Congress. CARB is a California governmental agency that promotes and protects public health, welfare and ecological resources through the reduction of air pollutants.

What agency establishes the laws that affect the emissions controls on my vehicle?

The State of California has long been recognized as one of the major air pollution problem areas in the United States. CARB was established in part to study this problem and implement changes to reduce air pollution. CARB has been leading the nation in implementation of strict emissions requirements for motor vehicles through the use of emission control devices and biannual motor vehicle smog-check program. Vehicles that are labeled as "California Emissions Equipped Vehicles" vehicles meet the emissions requirement of CARB for that particular model year.

The EPA establishes the pollution laws and regulations for states other than California. Vehicles that are labeled as "Federal" emission equipped vehicles meet the emissions requirement of the EPA for that particular model year.

Have other states adopted the California emissions laws?

In recent years, other states have suffered similar air pollution problems similar to those that faced California. Instead of these states enacting their own set of emissions laws, the federal government offered the California laws as an alternative. Instead of having 50 different sets of emissions laws, states must choose between either the California or Federal regulations.

At the present time there are several states that have enacted the California laws (i.e. Mass., Maine, New York, and Vermont) and new vehicles are sold as "California Emissions Equipped Vehicles". You can easily determine the emissions status of your car by referring to the emissions decal that is placed under the hood of your car.

Is my vehicle required to be submitted to a tailpipe emissions "smog-check?

This depends on the state that you reside in and the local requirements. For example in California, smog-checks are required in populated areas, but not in selected rural areas. With laws and regulations changing at an increasing rate, it is very difficult for the aftermarket to keep ahead of these changes. We suggest you contact your local or state agencies for information regarding your emissions laws.

Can I legally replace an emissions sensitive part on my car with an aftermarket product?

In the state of California, it is not legal to replace an emissions sensitive device without the replacement part having an exemption from CARB. Although replacing a particular device might have no apparent effect on the emissions, and the car might even pass a tail pipe "smog-check", the replacement part is still not considered emissions legal. In many cases, the mandatory visual inspection of the vehicle prior to an official state required smog-check may result in immediate failure of the test if a non-exempt part is identified.

A part that has been issued a CARB exemption has been subjected to strict laboratory testing as required by CARB in order to demonstrate that the replacement part will not increase emissions. (These tests are NOT the same as the "smog check" test and often require "cold start" testing procedures in order to test the efficiency of the emissions system during the initial seconds of the start-up cycle.) A part that has successfully passed these tests will be appointed an Executive Order number and will be listed on the CARB website for reference. Every Executive Order part or modification has an assigned number that can be verified by Smog Check stations, BAR Referee stations, or by the ARB. This number should be displayed on or near the emissions sensitive part for reference by a smog check technician.

For a database listing of current exempt parts, visit:
http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/aftermkt/devices/amquery.php (http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/aftermkt/devices/amquery.php)


What does it mean when an aftermarket product is advertised as "CARB Exempt" or "50 State Legal"?

Although a part may be advertised as "50 State Legal", this may be more of a marketing statement than reality. Unless an emissions sensitive part has been issued an Executive Order number by CARB, or an EPA exemption, FOR THAT SPECIFIC VEHICLE OR ENGINE CLASSIFICATION, the part is NOT legal for street use. Period, end of statement! If you must have a CARB exempt component for your vehicle, obtain the exemption number from the manufacturer prior to your purchase and verify the application status at the CARB link above.

Parts that are typically appointed CARB exemptions include: headers, air filter/intakes, turbo kits, and supercharger kits. Parts that are typically not eligible for a CARB exemption include, but are not limited to: many OBD II replacement catalytic converters (as of 2008, the number of CARB exempted direct replacement 1996 and later OBD II catalytic converters is limited), downpipes or headers that remove or relocate a catalytic converter, and performance carburetor kits. Contact the manufacturer of a product that you are considering purchasing for details regarding that specific component.

An exhaust system that is installed AFTER the catalytic converter is considered a "cat-back" system and is considered emissions legal. (Sound level restrictions may be an issue in your state, check with the exhaust manufacturer or you local authorities for more information.)

Can I replace the OEM catalytic converter on my car with a "high flow" catalytic converter?

The catalytic converter plays a major role in the emissions reduction of a motor vehicle. The vehicle manufacturer has matched a specific catalytic converter to the vehicle to minimize emissions output. Both CARB and the EPA do not allow the replacement of a catalytic converter with non-exempt "high flow" performance replacement unit. In fact, it is technically not legal to even replace a converter unless it has been proven by technician to have failed, and then it can only be replaced with an exempt OEM equivalent unit. (However, enforcement of this requirement is almost non-existent and is the primary loop-hole that allows the usage of so-called "high flow" catalytic converters. Many of these units are sold with the disclaimer as being a "race" component and are not intended for street use.) Due to the hundreds of vehicle models produced over the years, it is virtually impossible to determine by glancing under a car whether the converter is the original unit, a legal OEM replacement, or a non-legal aftermarket "high flow" performance unit. Unless CARB or the EPA decide to take more aggressive enforcement action, the installation and usage of these non-exempt "high flow" catalytic converters will likely continue.


Why does my vehicle have to be inspected at a Test-Only Station?


"In order to comply with the mandates of the federal Clean Air Act, the Department of Consumer Affairs/Bureau of Automotive Repair (DCA/BAR) began directing fifteen percent (15%) of all vehicles in Enhanced Areas to Test Only Stations in 1998. However, DCA/BAR has gradually increased the number of vehicles directed to Test-Only stations to continually improve program effectiveness and comply with the emission reduction objectives set forth in the State Implementation Plan, which is a master plan for complying with federal air quality requirements."

Motorist Notification. The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) notifies owners of vehicles which have been selected to have their initial Smog Check inspections performed at Test-Only Stations. The Registration Renewal Notice sent to these vehicle owners will say "Smog Certification Required at Test-Only Facility." If this statement is on your Renewal Notice and you take the vehicle to a test-and-repair station, the technician at the station will be unable to certify your vehicle. These vehicles must be inspected at a Test-Only Station. source:California Bureau of Automotive Repair


How to do a California legal EFI engine swap:
by Brad Bergholdt
Automotive Tech Instructor at Evergreen State College in San Jose, CA The state of California allows you to swap a wide assortment of engines into your car or truck, as long as the engine is the same year or newer than the chassis, and all of it's emission controls are intact. Problem areas could be a heavy duty vs. light duty truck engine swap, or a CA vs. federal engine swap. Also, I don't believe it's permissible to downgrade from fuel injection to a carburetor, or from a feedback fuel system back to a mechanical one. To play it safe, you'll want to pick up and read the state's engine swap pamphlet (available from the Bureau of Auto Repair), and ask a question or two of the smog referee before getting too far along. Most CA Consumer Assistance Centers (smog referees) are located in a community college, and you should be able to stop by, without an appointment, for some quick advice.

In my case, I swapped a CA 1989 Lincoln MK-7 V-8 engine (same as a Mustang 5.0 HO) into a CA 1983 RX-7. Early Mustang 5.0 engines and all MK-7 5.0 engines are of the speed density type (a MAP sensor is used to calculate airflow), while later ones have a MAF (mass airflow) sensor. The MAF system is more compatible with engine modifications, and can be retrofitted to a speed density engine, if desired. The HO engine found in the Lincoln MK-7 and Mustang produces approximately 70 more horsepower than the stock 5.0 EFI engine, and has factory tubular steel exhaust headers, which fit the RX-7 chassis like they were made for it.

The Lincoln engine was equipped with fuel injection, electronic ignition, and the following emission controls: PCV, air injection, EVAP, EGR, and all related components, wires, and vacuum hoses. The RX-7 came equipped with a carburetor, and a considerable inventory of emissions devices, but no feedback controls. The "chassis" systems of the RX-7 that needed to be retained were the catalytic converter (or a suitable replacement) and the EVAP (charcoal canister and plumbing) system.

This part of the engine swap isn't as bad as it sounds, as most of the needed fuel system and emission controls are integrated into the engine package, with the exception of a few solenoids and relays, which mount to the body, and the catalytic converter. There are five convenient wiring harness connectors exiting the engine harness, each of which was connected to the appropriate RX-7 circuits.

Having a complete donor vehicle is by far the best way to go, as you'll have all the parts and wiring needed, plus the vacuum hose routing sticker. Don't forget to write down the VIN number of the donor vehicle, for the referee's use, and for yourself- for future engine adjustments/repairs. Also, I utilized the Lincoln's AOD four speed automatic transmission (the overdrive is nice, considering the RX-7's 3.90 rear gears), never separating it from the engine during removal or installation into the RX-7

Having kept the computer engine/transmission harness fully connected, and all solenoids and relays still attached to it, I laid this out in the Mazda engine compartment, looking for the best routing and mounting locations. I decided to mount the TAB (thermactor air bypass) and TAD (thermactor air divert) solenoids on the RX-7 firewall, along with the EEC (main system) power relay, MAP sensor, and EGR solenoid. These were lined up on the right side of the firewall, behind the windshield washer bottle. It was necessary to splice/lengthen the MAP, TAB and TAD solenoid wires about a foot, so the main wiring harness could be routed below the parts, and through the firewall (the computer needs to be mounted inside the cabin for protection). The only emission device that wasn't "self contained" on or very near the Lincoln engine was the EVAP solenoid. All that was needed here was to route a hose (the larger of the two) from the original RX-7 EVAP charcoal canister (right side of the engine compartment) to the solenoid. Now, the Lincoln computer purges the Mazda charcoal canister, as if it were its own.

That's about it for the under-hood emissions stuff! My donor vehicle didn't have a check engine (MIL) light. If it had, I would have needed to add a MIL light to the Mazda dash, and connect a couple of additional wires.

Now the catalytic converter. The referee's application manual states that the 1983 RX-7 needs an "oxidizing catalyst" (doesn't say how many). I didn't want to run the original RX-7 exhaust, as it was a tangle of heavy pipes, two catalytic converters, and a mass of rattling heat shields. Instead, I fabricated my own two-into-one Y-pipe, welded to the Lincoln's 02 sensor equipped header collectors. (J.C Whitney pre-bent 90 degree and 45 degree aluminized pipes worked great) and sent the two 2-1/4" pipes into a 3" Flowmaster collector), then fed it to a Catco (aftermarket) 3" in, 3" out TWC (three way) catalytic converter. I opted for the TWC cat, as the Lincoln engine had down-stream air injection (that needed to be utilized), and it was difficult to find a 3" oxidizing cat with the needed air inlet tube. The smog referee was OK with substituting the TWC cat for the oxidizing type, as it is superior in emissions performance, and matched the type the Lincoln originally came with. Further downstream is a Flowmaster 3" in, dual 2-1/2 out 50 series muffler. The exhaust tips look like the original RX-7's, but it definitely doesn't sound like a rotary (more like a big-block Chevy). I should add that I retained some of the Mazda floor heat shields, and fabricated additional ones in the needed locations to help keep things cool.

After completing the engine swap, I made an appointment with the state (smog) referee. He was a friendly gent, and was pleased that I had the Lincoln VIN number, and the smog devices neatly organized. After a visual inspection, he ran the car on the smog machine (very clean numbers), and performed a functional test of the EGR system, ignition timing, and fuel tank cap (they all passed). I then received the coveted door jamb sticker, and after paying $38.25 ($30-inspection, $8.25-smog certificate), I was on my way. Next time I need a smog inspection, I can take it anywhere, thanks to the attached BAR label.

joe's gt
12-13-2008, 09:00 AM
Thanks, Mario.

A lot of useful information that I think will help others who live in Cali and want to mod there cars. I guess if ur looking for big power and lots of mods ur going to have to have a friend or smog shop to cheat the system or be really good at hiding stuff. I have already photoshoped fake CARB labels, but its not like u can have 5 CARB labels under ur hood. lol.

I'm still looking for someone with a highly modded car on here who is living in CA that actually has to go through the system ( WHICH EXCLUDES YOU Rob :) ) to report on maybe how they hid things or how they acquired their shop hookup.

v8killer
10-13-2009, 06:50 PM
soooooo what your trying to say is that the only way to pass smog with a third gen 3SGTE in a st165 in cali thats black and has a GFB bov among other things is to go to sacramento and aske a certain shop to charge a "fee" to pass the car like your average eg6??? yup thats the only way- just a guess....... :duh: ;)

Shadowlife25
10-13-2009, 11:31 PM
Or just recirculate the BOV and not have any issues.

Finally decided to come and post for yourself huh? ;)

joe's gt
10-14-2009, 05:23 AM
soooooo what your trying to say is that the only way to pass smog with a third gen 3SGTE in a st165 in cali thats black and has a GFB bov among other things is to go to sacramento and aske a certain shop to charge a "fee" to pass the car like your average eg6??? yup thats the only way- just a guess....... :duh: ;)

The unfortunate truth of living in CA. But besides that and the high cost of living, I will stay. Smog is just a minor workaround. Will (freshnicity) needs to get his smog tech license fast so he can hook a brotha up ;)

On a more serious note, glad u decided to finally post back yourself. These guys have a wealth of knowledge that they gladly will give away to anyone who wants to listen and learn.

I have personally met Mario (shadowlife25) and he is nice as f*ck really knows his shit. Remembering tacos...mouth now watering

Freshnicity
10-14-2009, 05:33 AM
The unfortunate truth of living in CA. But besides that and the high cost of living, I will stay. Smog is just a minor workaround. Will (freshnicity) needs to get his smog tech license fast so he can hook a brotha up ;)

On a more serious note, glad u decided to finally post back yourself. These guys have a wealth of knowledge that they gladly will give away to anyone who wants to listen and learn.

I have personally met Mario (shadowlife25) and he is nice as f*ck really knows his shit. Remembering tacos...mouth now watering

lol Im working on it. I can still hook you up without my license, i told you that lol.

And yeah, Mario knows his shit for sure, always one of the first dudes i turn to when I need a hand now.

Smog laws in CA suck hard, but if you get out there and make some friends, its not big deal.

Im seeing a Lake Berryessa run soon..since a lot of yall in close by anyway

Car_Barn_Bandit
04-20-2010, 07:34 PM
Si entiendes español en California, este todo es más fácil...

andy
04-20-2010, 08:14 PM
move out of cali

187flatliner
04-20-2010, 08:33 PM
^^^^^ or just know a good friend in another state that ur willing to see every two years or so for re-inspections.....lol

lalojamesliz
04-21-2010, 11:22 PM
Si entiendes español en California, este todo es más fácil...

LOL!!! that shit is so true :biggrin::laugh:

do you guys know how the smog rules are in arizona?

joe's gt
04-22-2010, 04:33 AM
Holy thread revival Batman. I am actually doing a speech on this soon. Not about the emissions restrictions per say, i don't have a problem with that, more so about the restriction on aftermarket parts which have no significant effect on emissions whatsoever considering cars spend most of their life at constant throttle anyway.

Car_Barn_Bandit
04-22-2010, 04:38 AM
I get annoyed with the holier-than-thou mentality by those who lead, but don't follow their own laws.

In Ohio, we nearly had a law put in place a few months back basically working toward the ban of aftermarket accessories on cars. I received a few flyers from SEMA urging me to contact the state legislature and bitch at them because of the job loss in the state.

Tie that in with the Cash-For-Clunkers nonsense where a fully usable parts-car has to be scrapped to avoid resale of parts, (recycling is green, and parts create jobs) I just get fed up with it. If I wanted to buy a government subsidized car, I would own one. But in every single sci-fi book and movie, the main character escapes in the old, gas drinking, smoke spewing, car of yesteryear.

Rant Over.

I am not looking forward to the prospect of having my car towed because I put in a V6 powerplant that churns out less emissions and gets better fuel economy because it's different. I was tempted to paint my car black to spite the possible law banning them because they're "too hot" for AC.

Boycott!Swagger
04-22-2010, 04:40 AM
I'm not in any way shape or form familiar with smog and emissions. So this question is just a question. Wouldn't one be able to run two seperate ecu's? With a 3sgte if you knew someone with an mr2 or something wouldn't it be possible to just do a quick ecu swap before tests, im sure the car wouldn't run well but if the mr2 runs emissions that pass, would there be any possibilities to use that ecu then swap it out later?

4thgenceli
04-22-2010, 05:42 AM
What do you need to know about AZ? 27yr resident..

joe's gt
04-22-2010, 05:58 AM
I'm not in any way shape or form familiar with smog and emissions. So this question is just a question. Wouldn't one be able to run two seperate ecu's? With a 3sgte if you knew someone with an mr2 or something wouldn't it be possible to just do a quick ecu swap before tests, im sure the car wouldn't run well but if the mr2 runs emissions that pass, would there be any possibilities to use that ecu then swap it out later?

yeah, but the problem is they do a visual inspection under your hood. Cali is so bad that pretty much any hint of shiny chrome on the engine will warrant an automatic fail.That's overexaggerating of course, but pretty much anything aftermarket on your engine and you fail. These parts have no significant effects on emissions cuz the car idles the same and is the same at constant throttle.

CA puts these restrictions in place because they say it has an impact on emissions and encourages street racing. Emissions is just BS, they want to make money, and the encouraging street racing is much to be debated considering kids street race in barely over 100hp stockers all the time.

Car_Barn_Bandit
04-22-2010, 06:23 AM
CA puts these restrictions in place because they say it has an impact on emissions and encourages street racing. Emissions is just BS, they want to make money, and the encouraging street racing is much to be debated considering kids street race in barely over 100hp stockers all the time.

Every episode of COPS that I've seen with street racing, has been in California on stock vehicles.

It's a feel good law. It doesn't do anything but make them feel better about themselves for passing it because they drive a car some lobbyist paid for.

lalojamesliz
04-23-2010, 03:25 AM
What do you need to know about AZ? 27yr resident..

PM sent

Boycott!Swagger
04-23-2010, 06:00 PM
Couldn't you just rig up some kind of cover that looks stock and covers up all aftermarket goodies that would throw up red flags?

I mean if people can get away with counterfit money surely one could get away with not emission friendly car parts.

If not, then i would just move out of cali, or do suspension work and what not.

joe's gt
04-24-2010, 01:40 AM
Couldn't you just rig up some kind of cover that looks stock and covers up all aftermarket goodies that would throw up red flags?

I mean if people can get away with counterfit money surely one could get away with not emission friendly car parts.

If not, then i would just move out of cali, or do suspension work and what not.

This will just throw up a massive red flag. The smog techs have a diagram and know what the engine is suppose to look like. They are legally allowed to remove the cover and make sure its emissions legal.

I personally love where I am currently in Cali. Got the beach to my west and mountains to the east and great weather in between. The only bad thing about Cali is the cost of living and the car BS. Packing up and leaving because CA makes it slightly harder to do stuff to your car is a little drastic don't ya think?

ericfragola
08-20-2010, 05:40 PM
i know this threads a little old but just thought id throw this out there. i live in fairfield, CA and when i went to get my celica smogged, i know the intake wouldnt pass since i built it myself. so i took out the K&N cone filter and out the stock box back on. i left the chrome piping though. this was an automatic fail. so i went to my local hardware store and bought a rubber one and just slipped it over the chrome elbow. it passed visual inspection from there ;)

my biggest concern-just picked up my st165 with the 185 engine in it. i know the swap is legal, but im concerned with them hassling me about it...right now the engines all stock. as soon as i get it smogged and street legal, thats when im installing all the goodies. FMIC, BOV, boost controller...you know. all that fun stuff :) but right now the car is strictly for offroads since it doesnt have a cat or muffler. im going to buy a brand new cat, so i know it will pass emmissions. but i still feel like im going to get a major hassle. :P

---------- Post added at 09:40 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:38 AM ----------

oh...also, since its an engine swap (it wasnt done by me) the check engine lights on. idk if ill be hassled by that or not...

Car_Barn_Bandit
08-21-2010, 11:27 PM
Fairly certain that fails on inspection.

joe's gt
08-23-2010, 12:28 AM
Yeah, you can pass the smog referee with the engine in stock form and the swap is completely legal per BAR regulations... BUUUUUUUT the second you mod it and smog it, it will fail visual with FMIC. You will also fail for your CEL.

CEL is autofail.

FMIC, you COULD try to just remove piping and put on the TMIC for inspection and leave the FMIC on. Taking the actual IC off would be quite a chore.

Shadowlife25
08-23-2010, 03:55 PM
Intercooler does not effect any emissions related systems. It is solely for cooling the charge air.

You must either leave the ST185 engine as stock or have the bypass valve recirculated.
This refers to using a stock MR2 BPV only.
Any aftermaket blow off (open atmospheric discharge) will automatically fail you.

Any CEL as Joe said, will automatically fail you. Get that sorted out before you even consider bringing it in.

A FULLY WORKING exhaust system is required. Period. Without this, you will not be issued a SMOG certification.
This due to the fact that it would not legally be able to operate on the public roadways.

Post any other inquiries here :)

ericfragola
08-24-2010, 07:49 AM
CEL is autofail.

what about just removing the bulb? :P if i absolutely cant get it smogged, ill just go the easy route and get it hot smogged.

Shadowlife25
08-24-2010, 11:44 AM
what about just removing the bulb? :P if i absolutely cant get it smogged, ill just go the easy route and get it hot smogged.

You DO realize that having a fully functioning diagnostic system is also a requirement of passing smog....

wizzards581
08-26-2010, 04:53 PM
yea if they do a timing check then your done...

DblOSmith
08-27-2010, 07:55 PM
Exactly. I just failed today because I have a nice shiny intake on my 5th gen. Fuckin' bullshit. The car's immaculately maintained. I know it'd have no problem passing emissions.

Shadowlife25
08-27-2010, 10:58 PM
strangers in this place.... ;)

joe's gt
08-28-2010, 04:50 AM
Yup its BS. Bottom line, you can easily hide modifications by making them black or rusted looking. Unfortunately any shiny chrome in an old car's engine bay is pretty much an insta-fail here in CA. Even if it doesn't affect emissions.