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View Full Version : Becomming a Tech/Mechanic



sooinseo
06-25-2008, 05:04 AM
So i've decided i will go to trade school and become an automotive technition.

im basicly asking for pro's/con's

advice and school info

im leaning towards uti. guy called me today and told me they were ASE certified and what not and how they are a top rated automotive school and other schools are less.... obviously he will tell me these things

i heard lincoln tech is a no no

basicly i want to go to a tech school under and hour away from 19120 or 19038 philladelphia/glenside PA (2 places i can stay at while going to school) and respectable schools with good interm programs and basicly advice.

please reply!! seriouse decisions in my life!

liplip
06-25-2008, 05:20 AM
So you're going to take serious life advice from a message board? No offence guys.

sheep
06-25-2008, 05:21 AM
i thought for a while i would love to be a mechanic also and considered going to school, i think its a great profession for some and a not so great for others, before i made a commitment to going to school for it i thought long and hard about it and i decided it wasnt for me becuz i wasnt patiant enough to troubleshoot cars all day, as a hobbie i dont mind working on my vehicle from time to time but all the time every day is a bit much for me. when i told someone this they said that it takes alot of people a long time to decide that they were not ment to be a mechanic.

but if you choose to be one awesome, i heard UTI is pretty good and then wyotech was good too. granted this is just stuff that i have 'heard' and have not researched the specific school and have no idea where they are located. good luck!


So you're going to take serious life advice from a message board? No offence guys.

sounds to me like he is more just looking for opinions

T-spoon
06-25-2008, 05:54 AM
UTI and Wyotech..... ehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. Decide what you want to work on then decide what school to go through. If you want to work for Toyota, just go to a school that has T-Ten classes. There isn't a better way to get into Toyota service starting from scratch that I know of.

KoreanJoey
06-25-2008, 07:15 AM
Go to a Toyota dealership, ask them if they would allow you to intern for the Toyota TEN program.

http://www.toyota.com/about/tten/

yankee7568
06-25-2008, 07:23 AM
There is more money to be had in other careers in my opinion. Being auto tech you make only like 30-40 an hour for a top guy in a shop....... If you own your own bis (more of a head ache) but you make a lot more....... I have worked on cars for a living and when you work on them all day everyday you don't want to work on your own stuff. I see so many mech. take there car to get fixed when they can do it them selves and I understand it too. Its a big head ache............ But man if your young I would suggest on going to work for someone working on cars then after that you still want to work on them then go for it.....

KoreanJoey
06-25-2008, 07:38 AM
Some people just have it... I'm just working under a full tech (RixAE86) but he seems to be doing alright. I think 120+ hours flagged so far this pay period w/ 4 days to go... He's paid flat-rate, which means per job (IE: Front brakes with a rotor resurfacing = 2 hours) doesn't matter how long it takes. Better techs can do it in less time, flaggin more hours.

Myself on the other hand... yeah, not quite.

celicaGT90_05
06-25-2008, 07:42 AM
well, its technician btw, and you mean technologist lol technician is basically an uneducated person in a certain field. Anyway, Im going to a community college and its worked real well for me, have learned a lot even though I knew a good amount before. You might want to see whats in your area

sooinseo
06-25-2008, 04:17 PM
So you're going to take serious life advice from a message board? No offence guys.

i understand where your comming from but most of these guys are ''enthusiast's''(sp?) and some are tech/mechanics so im not ganna ask a bunch of smart doctors advice about being/becomming a tech. obviouse right choice in my oppinion


thank you hangkuk joey =] a couple people told me things in this line like.. u can make more money here and its easier in life there but... im not a book guy im not the type of guy that would 'enjoy' sitting on my ass for 8 hours a day writing/typing/reading shit.. im more of a handson hard labor guy.. droped out of school becuase i didnt like it.. so.. yeah.

on the toyota dealership thing yeh im going to try to intern at a dealership (hopefully toyota) i gatta go check out uti next next week and speak to the guy in the office that contacted me.

and toyota ten is that the thing like 'bmw fast track' and 'ford fact' becuase uti does offer something called Toyota Professional Automotive Training

so again thanks guys for all the helpful tips advice and opinions keep them comming

T-spoon
06-25-2008, 04:40 PM
on the toyota dealership thing yeh im going to try to intern at a dealership (hopefully toyota) i gatta go check out uti next next week and speak to the guy in the office that contacted me.

and toyota ten is that the thing like 'bmw fast track' and 'ford fact' becuase uti does offer something called Toyota Professional Automotive Training

so again thanks guys for all the helpful tips advice and opinions keep them comming

If ya want Toyota training, get it from Toyota, IMO. I've seen a few UTI guys go from shop and to shop and not make it in any of them. Granted they may have just been flakes to begin with but still.

sooinseo
06-25-2008, 04:42 PM
so what schools would u recomend? uti is a little expensive. but ive heard its good so..

atc is about the same amout i heard this place is good too

T-spoon
06-25-2008, 04:44 PM
If you want to do Toyota, check out KJ's linky that he gave you a few posts up.

sooinseo
06-25-2008, 04:52 PM
yeh i went to link and clicked ' look for a school ' and uti came up only one so uti is so far #1 on my list.

sooinseo
06-25-2008, 05:28 PM
oh yeah. im sure the internship wont hurt becuase i live accross the street from a toyota dealership =]] i can see it outside my window =]]

Amaymi
06-25-2008, 07:07 PM
99% of the younger techs in my Toyota dealership, including me, started on the lube racks. After a period of time they confronted our service manager about moving up and getting a bay, they then left to which ever school the service manager suggested they go. When they finished school he helped them out by buying them a box with basic tools (half of which was to be paid back) and he gave them bay.
I did it a little different because I am a college mechanical engineering student going for my masters. I skipped the trade school obviously and he just gave me a bay and box when the master techs told him I was ready.
I think that the best way to go if you intend to go to work in the town you live in now is to talk to several service managers from different dealerships and see what they recommend.

Cavanagh
06-25-2008, 07:15 PM
i thought for a while i would love to be a mechanic also and considered going to school, i think its a great profession for some and a not so great for others, before i made a commitment to going to school for it i thought long and hard about it and i decided it wasnt for me becuz i wasnt patiant enough to troubleshoot cars all day, as a hobbie i dont mind working on my vehicle from time to time but all the time every day is a bit much for me. when i told someone this they said that it takes alot of people a long time to decide that they were not ment to be a mechanic.

SAME with me, i just couldnt do it everyday.

And Sooinseo, they may require an English class. ;)

ciento44
06-25-2008, 07:40 PM
I wouldn't mind it, but i can't do the same things day in and day out on cars. I HATE doing brakes, changing oil, filters, the usual stuff because any monkey can do it.

I like slamming cars, replacing trannies, turbo-ing them... But i can't get on at a performance shop because i have holes in my knowledge, and don't have any certifications.

sooinseo
06-25-2008, 08:56 PM
SAME with me, i just couldnt do it everyday.

And Sooinseo, they may require an English class. ;)


WAHT DOES U MEAN I SPEAK ENGLISH VERY GOOD.

-.- yeh i type funny. i speak english fluently but i am dumb. but anyway thanks for good advice and the whole job thing being not ur dream job... thats opinions that i will take in consideration and ultimately i want to own a shop or work in performance but it all starts in 1 place.. dealership i geuss. but amaymi are u saying i gatta work before i go into school? i was thinking go into school THEN go get intern'd then ill be more likely get hired ??? and i figgure i get experiance while in school so when i get out it'll be easier

Amaymi
06-26-2008, 01:26 AM
No you don't have to work before hand, but the way that my shop does it has some large advantages.

The first, and in my opinion the biggest, is that you'll be guaranteed a job right after you finish schooling. By going in as a lube tech first and working hard you can prove to the service managers and the master techs that you would be a good addition to the shop. You can also spend time watching the techs and observing how things are done in the real world instead of on paper. Going into your schooling with some knowledge already under your belt will probably help a lot in understanding what to do instead of just knowing what to do.

Second is that you will already have people there that know you and would be willing to help you, especially if they know your a hard worker, when you inevitably get stuck on something or totally messing something up.

Third is that you'll get sometime to see how working as a tech/mechanic really is and if its the right thing for you before you go and spend money on a trade school. Some people get burned out on it quickly and some are happy doing it the rest of their lives.

Really my point was to go and talk the the service managers in the shops around you. Ask them their opinions. If they are willing to go this route awesome. If not then by all means go to school. People have been successful both ways. Just find out all of your options before hand.

ST185
06-26-2008, 06:46 AM
I chose to go to uti thinking it was a good idea but it turns out that it wasn't that much of a smart idea. The classes are to fast and you have to basically rush to learn everything. I want to take the T-Ten program but they pretty much force you to take the auto program before you can take any other program.

KoreanJoey
06-26-2008, 08:01 AM
No you don't have to work before hand, but the way that my shop does it has some large advantages.

The first, and in my opinion the biggest, is that you'll be guaranteed a job right after you finish schooling. By going in as a lube tech first and working hard you can prove to the service managers and the master techs that you would be a good addition to the shop. You can also spend time watching the techs and observing how things are done in the real world instead of on paper. Going into your schooling with some knowledge already under your belt will probably help a lot in understanding what to do instead of just knowing what to do.

Second is that you will already have people there that know you and would be willing to help you, especially if they know your a hard worker, when you inevitably get stuck on something or totally messing something up.

Third is that you'll get sometime to see how working as a tech/mechanic really is and if its the right thing for you before you go and spend money on a trade school. Some people get burned out on it quickly and some are happy doing it the rest of their lives.

Really my point was to go and talk the the service managers in the shops around you. Ask them their opinions. If they are willing to go this route awesome. If not then by all means go to school. People have been successful both ways. Just find out all of your options before hand.

Funny story about this...

KJ = ^^^

sooinseo
06-26-2008, 06:13 PM
amaymi thanks for the great advice. i will try to get a job in a shop/dealership as a 'lube tech' but what do they do? real simple sstuffs like oil changes i geuss?? let me know what kinda stuff im jumping into but now that u explain it.. it sounds much better UR way =]

sooinseo
06-26-2008, 06:16 PM
I chose to go to uti thinking it was a good idea but it turns out that it wasn't that much of a smart idea. The classes are to fast and you have to basically rush to learn everything. I want to take the T-Ten program but they pretty much force you to take the auto program before you can take any other program.

too fast for u? or too fast for everyone?? this is a seriouse question.. how old are u / were u and are u smart at all <-- car smart. i have questioned the 'how hard is it would i be able to jump in it with out much knowledge' and my friends all told me the same thing. ' i know people who dont know how to read or write and they became techs i know some idiots on welfare who are lazy as $hit and passed' so i figgure ill do alright.. no offense to u ST185

ciento44
06-26-2008, 07:00 PM
No you don't have to work before hand, but the way that my shop does it has some large advantages.

The first, and in my opinion the biggest, is that you'll be guaranteed a job right after you finish schooling. By going in as a lube tech first and working hard you can prove to the service managers and the master techs that you would be a good addition to the shop. You can also spend time watching the techs and observing how things are done in the real world instead of on paper. Going into your schooling with some knowledge already under your belt will probably help a lot in understanding what to do instead of just knowing what to do.

Second is that you will already have people there that know you and would be willing to help you, especially if they know your a hard worker, when you inevitably get stuck on something or totally messing something up.

Third is that you'll get sometime to see how working as a tech/mechanic really is and if its the right thing for you before you go and spend money on a trade school. Some people get burned out on it quickly and some are happy doing it the rest of their lives.

Really my point was to go and talk the the service managers in the shops around you. Ask them their opinions. If they are willing to go this route awesome. If not then by all means go to school. People have been successful both ways. Just find out all of your options before hand.

Make sure that there will be openings later on.... i know 3 people that took this route, and partially due to their complacency and lack of space for higher trained employees, after two years, they're still mounting tires and changing oil. But they're REALLY good at it. :hehe:

Amaymi
06-27-2008, 05:32 AM
Yes lube techs do oil changes, mount and balance tires, patch tires, etc. As ciento44 said, make sure when you go in that you make your self clear to the service manager as to your intentions. Being a lube tech is deff. not something you want to do for a long time.

After you get in a dealership become acquainted with the master tech/s. I don't know how it is in other dealerships, but in my dealer ship the master techs have been there the longest. They worked there when my 87 Celica was new on the lot. They therefore have a lot of pull. One the master techs is the reason that I am a part-time, college kid, tech. Part time techs are not very common plus being a college kid means I'd have to miss work occasionally because of school. But since I impressed him with my work ethic and willingness to learn, he made sure that I had a stall and tools.

sooinseo
06-29-2008, 05:59 AM
ahh thanks amaymi for the great info and advice and everyone else. im going to check out uti in 2 weeks and i will tell u what i think.. as far as i know. my friend attends montco (montgomary county comm. collage) trying to become a tech and ive heard its MUCH cheaper BUT u have to take science, math, english and what not ... not really what i had in mind.. info on community collage courses would be helpful =] thanks.

KoreanJoey
06-29-2008, 09:07 AM
Dude, you'll have to do math, science and english to do T Ten...

sooinseo
06-30-2008, 09:59 PM
oh.. u do? why is that? care to explain a little more? i mnea im not stupid.. i can do math, science and everything but the courses are required?

Rix86
06-30-2008, 11:33 PM
If you want the assiciates degree, you have to take the courses that go with it.
I strongly recommend you do so.
I completed part of the associates stuff, but all of the t-ten stuff.
Should have got the degree, because you just never know where your life will take you.
If you actually have the "knack" for automotive work, it's not a bad carreer. it's not spectacular either.
If you have a hard time figuring out how to take car parts off and put them back on.... the auto field isn't likely for you.
UTI and wyotech have a good record on papaer as far as graduate placement, but long term graduate placement, I don't think is very high at all.
I've talked to a few (idiots) that graduated from places like that..... I personally wouldn't recommend it.
Maybe for the body work courses?

CHRiS'_CeLiCa
07-01-2008, 12:10 AM
I myself am going to school to be an automotive tech. For a few reasons, one to get me into the field and gain experience, to get me learning more about cars than i did before so i can work on my own and such, and two, whether i decide to actually be one or not, guess what, ive got a degree and even just that says something in this day and age.

sooinseo
07-02-2008, 01:44 AM
yeah chris i agree with u on both parts. i have another reason. i need a career LOL. i can keep working at these places i work at .. -.- not a bright future.. now im not looking for money.. if i was i wouldnt be even thinking about becoming a tech.. im looking for soemthing i can do for the rest of my life.. and i do feel like i can do this.. only time will tell.. thanks for all the great advice opinions and what not. much love for this site. i will be back with a fast ass alltrac =]]