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View Full Version : MUfflers and resonators?



sickcel
06-24-2008, 02:34 AM
Which is better a muffler or resonator? do they maje a horse power difference? suggestions.

Galcobar
06-24-2008, 10:13 AM
Mufflers and resonators are completely different forms of equipment. Aside from being cased in metal and part of the exhaust system, there's very little similar between them.

Be clear that a round muffler is not a resonator. A muffler absorbs the vibrations in the exhaust flow, either by bouncing it around various baffles (standard muffler, or with fewer baffles a "turbo" muffler), or wrapping a perforated tube with various forms of insulation (ceramic mesh, stainless steel wool, or in cheap/old designs fibreglass) to make what is know as a straight-through muffler. Mufflers are there primarily to reduce the volume, though they do somewhat smooth the tone.

A resonator does just that, it resonates. By bouncing soundwaves off each other, the vibration cancels out and is turned into heat. The stock Celica exhaust has a resonator -- you can tell the difference by tapping on the enlarged centre section. A resonator is an echo chamber and will ring like a bell when tapped, where a muffler will produce a dull response. The resonator is primarily for smoothing the exhaust note (that annoying, buzzy note from the Civic with a 3" pipe is because he doesn't have a resonator), but will somewhat reduce the volume.

While a resonator will have almost no effect on exhaust flow, and a straight-through muffler as little, a baffled muffler will impede exhaust flow and create backpressure. No, this is not good for NA engines. Backpressure is bad for all engines, at all times -- there is never a benefit to engine efficiency to forcing burnt exhaust gases back into the combustion chamber to foul the mix.

However, backpressure is inevitable when you have only one size of exhaust pipe and many different engine speeds. Manufacturers use exhausts sized to be most efficient generally at lower RPMs (particularly on economy designs) to emphasize acceleration -- which basically means they use smaller exhausts than enthusiasts with lead feet prefer. It's a matter of matching the exhaust pipe's capacity to the engine's exhaust output; higher RPMs on the same engine mean more exhaust flow. When you spend more time at high RPMs, a bigger exhaust pipe is preferred. Similarly, when you add turbo- or supercharging, or NOx, the engine produces uses more air and fuel, therefore producing more exhaust and requiring a bigger pipe, for the same reason a larger engine is matched with a larger pipe.

sickcel
06-26-2008, 02:37 AM
what would u advise for my car?

Ads28
06-26-2008, 02:45 AM
i suggest BOTH...i went with only a muffler and had a NASTY raspy shit sound...put a resonator back on and it solved the problem..for the most part...damn that header haha

ciento44
06-26-2008, 03:10 PM
what would u advise for my car?

I would advise a 2.25" mandrel bent side exit with one resonator, no muffler, but an oval 4" tip. :hehe:

No, but seriuosly, 2.25" inch, one resonator, and muffler of your choice.

505celicaGT
06-27-2008, 05:58 AM
I would advise a 2.25" mandrel bent side exit with one resonator, no muffler, but an oval 4" tip. :hehe:

No, but seriuosly, 2.25" inch, one resonator, and muffler of your choice.

i agree, (i perfer no muffler as well)