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tuner4life
12-31-2007, 07:30 PM
I recently replaced the radiator in my 1992 GT, the radiator that I purchased came with a small wire that is to be run between the radiator and the frame to ground it, but there are no holes in the radiator in which to put it, and I am definitely not going to drill into it.

None of the other cars in which I have replaced radiators have had this wire, and the old radiator that I pulled out didn't either.

Is this necessary?? What will happen If I dont hook it up?? If it is necessary, where would I attach it to the radiator??

Mafix
12-31-2007, 07:46 PM
not sure what you got but there is no ground.

alltracman78
12-31-2007, 11:53 PM
Yeah, no radiator ground.

Frenchy
01-01-2008, 01:24 AM
What are some things to consider regrounding???

grayscale
01-01-2008, 02:01 AM
Radiator ground, now that's just ridiculous.

tuner4life
01-01-2008, 05:52 AM
Radiator ground, now that's just ridiculous.

Thats what I thought, but the company went through the effort of including a 10" section of wire with lugs on each end and a paper saying that in order to lengthen the life of the radiator, it had to be installed.

I dunno, It was an ebay radiator though, maybe that has something to do with it. :wtf:

grayscale
01-01-2008, 09:05 AM
Maybe it's meant to draw the negative electrodes out of the coolant thus inhibiting rust...lol, I have no idea either.

celicaGT90_05
01-01-2008, 09:08 AM
unless your radiator is modified so that the electrical charge the fluid builds up unloads to the battery, there is absolutely no ground for the radiator for the cooling system uses 0 electronics ecept the temp sensor

Carolina91GT-S
01-01-2008, 06:16 PM
Grounding your radiator will make your car faster.

no, not really.


Agree with the other posts, no specific reason to ground it that I know of. But if the manufacturer says it will extend the life, I'd consider doing it. Think about it, your radiator is only connected to the car via non conductive compounds. The seats that support in on the bottom are rubber and the hold downs on the top have a rubber pad between the hold down and the radiator. It is connected to the engine via the rubber cooling hoses. If a charge does build up in the radiator body it has no where to go except through the fluid which is also inside the engine which is grounded, I guess that should suffice if it actually needed grounding. I guess it really depends on the resistivity of the engine coolant. Then there is the temp sensor but it is electrically isolated fromt he body of the radiator too. I can't see how grounding it would harm it.

celicaGT90_05
01-01-2008, 06:46 PM
Well to explain how the coolant does become electrically charged, it is due to various metals used because each element has a different amount of electrons. When there is an electron imbalance between 2 conductive materials that are close enough to each other, the electrons begin to jump from the more negatively charged atom to the less negatively charged atom. Therefore, it causes the cooling system to act like a giant battery with a tiny amount of voltage. This in turn can cause premature failure of all seals and rapid break down of the hoses, which is one of the reasons they recommend flushing the system every 2-3 years. The thing is, I'm not sure why grounding it would help, it makes more sense to me to connect it to the battery positive so that it can unload its charge unless it has negative voltage which is unlikely...then again, electricity is a very tricky energy to deal with

TurboTRDCelica
01-03-2008, 05:19 PM
The reason why they say to ground the radiator is exactly what you are talking about
in the process of those electrons jumping around in a bi-metal engine the coolant will begin to develop alkilinity SP?? having a ground stabilizes the coolant in the radiator. Is it worth doing? Do you plan on keeping the car for a long time like 10+years. If you have to modify anything it's not worth it. If it's as simple as loosening a few bolts I'd do it. You should be able to attach the wire where the fans bolt up.

Basically it comes down to opposites attract the alkilinity is a + and the ground is a negative & by grounding the radiator it actually stabilizes the coolant and prevents the coolant from breaking down & corroding the aluminum.

I have to say that you would not see any results for like 15 yrs from simply grounding the radiator.

Have you ever yanked a head off a 7M that ran green anti-freeze almost every 7M head that ran green anti-freeze blows the head gasket after so long & the head is often so corroded it's toast. That's why they developed GM-Dexcool/Toyota Red anti-freeze. I beleive they added phosphates they put in to help prevent the alkilinity of the coolant. Also a good ground system is absolutely key to preventing corrosion in a bi-metal engine.

Rick89GTS
01-03-2008, 09:05 PM
Wow.
Learn something new everyday. Never thought about grounding the radiator before this thread

tuner4life
01-03-2008, 10:20 PM
Makes sense, but I was under the assumption that Red GM Dexcool had lots of problems with corroding and eating away radiators?? I've always been told to avoid Dexcool GM red coolant at all costs.

Trance4c
01-03-2008, 10:42 PM
I figure.. but I would also say that regular coolant changes, using good fluid an DISTILLED water shouldn't have Alkini problems.

You want to run good coolant though, I wouldn't mess with any of these.. Engine Ice .. completely different chemical make up even green friendly antifreeze. Expensive.. but its a small price to pay for a system that should run fairly maintenance free for a good number of years.

I can't imagine a ground strap.. ha.. funny, I learned something new too... I get the idea, but never knew people did that.. seems a bit of a stretch.

grayscale
01-04-2008, 10:46 AM
That's actually a bit backwards, it's acidity that will corrode (the opposite of alkalinity), known as ph level. Distilled water is said to be alkali, will tap water is more acidic. grounding would do very little, if anything, to affect this as you would need to add a chemical to change the ph.

extremeskillz
01-04-2008, 01:37 PM
I recently replaced the radiator in my 1992 GT, the radiator that I purchased came with a small wire that is to be run between the radiator and the frame to ground it, but there are no holes in the radiator in which to put it, and I am definitely not going to drill into it.

None of the other cars in which I have replaced radiators have had this wire, and the old radiator that I pulled out didn't either.

Is this necessary?? What will happen If I dont hook it up?? If it is necessary, where would I attach it to the radiator??
Guess they figured you wanted to put a neon on the radiator so they hooked you up with some prewire installation to make the job easier :hehe:

MoralWarfare
01-04-2008, 02:41 PM
holy crap just don't install the wire.

celicaGT90_05
01-04-2008, 02:54 PM
^ you're too blunt and eager to make no point, at least some people are learnin somethin here.

Also, grayscale, I know that its acidicity that creates corrosion, but the fact that the cooling system carries a load of electricity is harsh on the cooling system, which is a reason they recommend changing the fluid...at least, thats what I've been tought.

tuner4life
01-04-2008, 03:51 PM
Adding something like "water wetter" should have a positive effect on corrosion too, right?? plus keeping temps cooler.

MoralWarfare
01-04-2008, 11:06 PM
^ you're too blunt and eager to make no point, at least some people are learnin somethin here.

Also, grayscale, I know that its acidicity that creates corrosion, but the fact that the cooling system carries a load of electricity is harsh on the cooling system, which is a reason they recommend changing the fluid...at least, thats what I've been tought.

holy crap.