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View Full Version : Anyone worked as a Toyota technician?



turbo4ag
08-26-2007, 04:21 PM
Im currently enrolled in an Auto tech program and will most likely be completing it this spring. At that point I will have an Associates degree, and most likely AT LEAST... 4 ASE certifications, Im going for all 8 of them, but Im only gonna guarantee passing 4 since I understand them so well.

What I want to know is:
1. Is the T-Ten toyota certification required, or can one go straight to work at the Dealer then learn or get certified by a certain deadline (say withing 6 months)?
2. Whats the starting wage (flat rate) for someone with an AS degree & 4 ASE certs. and how many flat rate hours are usually earned (assuming 40 hour schedule) by a beginning tech?


Thanks in advance.

turbo4ag
08-27-2007, 12:49 AM
Wow, no Toyota techs? just enthusiasts?

Does anybody work in any type of dealership here? or are we all poor?

Mr Celica
08-27-2007, 01:06 AM
my dad is a toyota tech. he has also owned his own toyota business, and is ASE certified.

T-spoon
08-27-2007, 01:41 AM
Ok well, I'm in parts, not service. Rix and Alltracman are both Toyota techs, there may be a few others. However, I did start the t-ten and had intended to first work in the shop. You don't have to have t-ten to start out. You can even start out in the lube team changing oil and train as you go and move on to flag time and such. As far as pay, it varies alot. Lube doesn't get paid much and is hourly AFAIK (may be different from dealer to dealer). Other techs will vary depending on how much work they get and what kind it is, which depends on how good they are, what kind fo relationship they have with the service writers and probably on certs also, which goes back to how good they are. Some master techs could make a lot, some probably make only a little more than lube which is probably like.. 8-9/hour.

85gtsblackman
08-27-2007, 02:45 AM
i was a toyota tech, if u work for a good dealership, and good people , its great

if u end up like me and everyone is out to swindle everyone else.....well i left after a year and a month so yeah


ill tell u this though, if u like working on cars as a hobby i wouldnt make it my main job, just my 2 cents

Shadowlife25
08-27-2007, 03:37 AM
Used to be a Mazda Rotary Tech. for 10 years, then worked for Toyota/Chevrolet as a Toyota Technician. Got tired of repetitive crap work, so now I work in a smaller shop and choose my jobs.

No t-10 to get started. I make $28hr flat rate. Pay varies mostly by location and company.

turbo4ag
08-27-2007, 07:45 PM
Used to be a Mazda Rotary Tech. for 10 years, then worked for Toyota/Chevrolet as a Toyota Technician. Got tired of repetitive crap work, so now I work in a smaller shop and choose my jobs.

No t-10 to get started. I make $28hr flat rate. Pay varies mostly by location and company.

Sounds great.

I want to start out at a real dealership making around $13/hr flat rate and finish a manufacturer program, then move out of FL to go back up north. Hope to be somewhere around $18-20 flat rate within the next 2 years if I have all 8 of them.

Eventually get L1 cert. and open my own shop or work with a race team. I have no plans to be working for anyone else past age 30, unless its a race tech. I am now 23. Sounds to ambitious?

CHRiS'_CeLiCa
08-27-2007, 09:39 PM
You don't have to have t-ten to start out. You can even start out in the lube team changing oil and train as you go and move on to flag time and such. As far as pay, it varies alot. Lube doesn't get paid much and is hourly AFAIK

Ya, in the program i am in, we(the students)have to get a job in the automotive industry as a requirement to earn credits to gradiate, most people in the program usually do just that, start as a lube tech, and then work up, and yes it is an hourly pay as i am told by my instructor.....

turbo4ag,

where are you from in fla and what auto tech program are you in?...because i am in the auto tech program at SFCC in Gainesville,FL and it is one of the top Auto Tech schools in the nation so im pretty psyched....neway, there is this guy i heard about that is in his 2nd year of his AS auto degree and is workin for Toyota, and every fri, they send him to "Toyota school" in Orlando,FL and by doing this, about the same time he graduates SFCC, he will be finishing "Toyota school" become a toyota tech and start makin big money right out of the program...this is something i am going to look into and try to attempt myself and hopefully it takes me somewhere.

Shadowlife25
08-28-2007, 04:59 AM
Just FYI, you can command a higher pay rate if:

You have your own tools

[good rule of thumb is to buy tools that you will be using most often. Get them from the Snap-on/Mac/Matco guy. Buy one set every week or two. Only get what you can pay off completely in that period. This will help you to both build your tool arsenal, and get you closer to a raise in pay]

You have ASE certs

[Make sure you have at LEAST 2-3 by the time you finish school, this will make a HUGE difference in paygrade]

You have previous experience

[Work as a lube-monkey for a while. EVERYONE starts somewhere ;)]

You specialize (ie. Toyota school, brake systems, diagnostics, suspension tech, chassis fab...)

[Specialization means that you will become proficient in your chosen field much sooner. This again = a raise in paygrade]

Hope this helps

turbo4ag
08-28-2007, 08:58 PM
Im in South Florida.

-Im pretty sure I will get atleast 4 certs by May's graduation
-I've already started my tool collection. I wanted Snap-on, and they give us a 50% discount since Im in a program, but they are still too expensive. I can't afford them as a college student.
-have no experience, but Im hoping to change that in teh next 6 months. I really dont want to start out as a lube tech if I dont have to
-specializing in Engine Repair, Performance & Driveability, Suspension & Brakes. Pretty much like every other starting tech (afraid of electrics, transmissions & drivetrain even though those pay the most)

Shadowlife25
08-29-2007, 05:19 AM
Well, when it comes to your tools, they are your livelihood. DON'T CHEAP OUT!
Electrical systems are nothing to be afraid of, and drivetrains aren't either. They're quite simple really. That's one of the reasons I get paid the $$$ I do.

I don't touch transmissions. Period. They're teh suck to work on if they're automatics (which most are :puke: ). Plus you'd pretty much need to have a job lined up at a transmission shop or a dealer to get any real experience with them.

Nice thing about working for someone else, medical coverage is a must.

turbo4ag
08-30-2007, 12:13 AM
Yeah I meant to ask that question before.

Do any shops cover your health insurance or do they just offer a policy? Also what can I expect pay as a starting tech per month for it ($50-75, $75-100, etc?)

Im turning 24 soon and no longer live with parents, so I will have to get my own health insurance soon.

Rix86
08-30-2007, 02:14 AM
If you're an enthusiast, you'll hate it, most likely.
SSSOOOOOOOOO FFFUUUUUCCCCKKKKKIIINNNNGGGGGG BOOOOOORRRRRRIIINNNNGGGGGG!!!!!!!!!!!!!1111oneoneo ne

turbo4ag
08-30-2007, 03:45 AM
I actually like fixing cars (so long as they are newer cars, not some old smelly minivan where the owner last changed oil in 1999).

Im an enthusiast, but more on the methodical side. The engineering, design, fabrication, and engine building. I care little for racing because nobody races on the track. And I wont risk getting my license and car taken for street racing. Also, where Im living the more you race your car and people see how fast it is, the more likely it is to get stolen.

People tow away cars with lowjack where Im from. They are ruthless.

Rix86
08-30-2007, 06:03 AM
I actually like fixing cars (so long as they are newer cars, not some old smelly minivan where the owner last changed oil in 1999).

You get alot of that.

Im an enthusiast, but more on the methodical side. The engineering, design, fabrication, and engine building.

Not much of that in a dealership.
boring stuff like inop a/c, fluid changes, runs bad or not at all, starters, etc etc.

I care little for racing because nobody races on the track.

Most toyota owners these days that go to dealerships seem to be barely able to drive on the street.....

And I wont risk getting my license and car taken for street racing. Also, where Im living the more you race your car and people see how fast it is, the more likely it is to get stolen.

People tow away cars with lowjack where Im from. They are ruthless.


You might like if for a few years or maybe longer, who knows.