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View Full Version : wish i could buy this *all-trac warning*



_kitten_
07-24-2007, 02:00 AM
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/car/377168077.html

i would drive up and buy this car if i wasn't in the process of buying a home :(

Shadowlife25
07-24-2007, 02:09 AM
Lolz... I posted this last week :D it is a nice 'Trac though. Also not overpriced.

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 02:11 AM
60 easy payments!

celicaGT90_05
07-24-2007, 02:24 AM
I do not like the way that pipe hangs out

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 02:28 AM
sweet jesus.. my diesel has a smaller exhaust tip then that. :laugh:

extremeskillz
07-24-2007, 03:25 AM
^lol

That a very nice mint condition alltrac.

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 03:55 AM
off topic but hey.. thats what this is.


the whole exhaust thing has got me wondering.

Im running 4" straight pipe with a 5" tip on the diesel. now since thats a turboed v-8 pushing over 500hp, i can see 4" pipe being justified.

but now how can 4" pipe be justified on a 2lt turboed 4cylinder?

celicaGT90_05
07-24-2007, 03:59 AM
but now how can 4" pipe be justified on a 2lt turboed 4cylinder?

3 inch would be more justified, but it being turboed, 4 inch piping isn't too bad unless he has cold air rushing back up. In all likeliness, its probably just a 4 inch tip and that muffler is probably 2-3 inch inlet

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 04:05 AM
but still.. im running twice the cylinders, and 4.6more liters, about 32lbs of boost, and 4" is ideal

im confuseled

Gary
07-24-2007, 04:25 AM
Because your diesel produces max hp at lower rpm.
To reach 500 hp on a 4 cyl. engine, we need to rev much higher than that.
That means both engine move roughly the same volume of air per minute.

Mr Celica
07-24-2007, 04:26 AM
pretty sure it wouldn't matter how big it is... its a turbo it doesn't rely on back pressure, as long as it isn't too small...

do you have dual exhaust on your truck? i've seen people run dual exhaust on a turbo diesel with like 5 inch from the headers back...

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 04:44 AM
single 4" from the turbo back, no kitty, no muffler.

from what my BASIC knowledge of diesels are is that the bigger pipes just help lower your egts

Mr Celica
07-24-2007, 04:54 AM
and make it a shit load louder...

Playfortoday
07-24-2007, 03:53 PM
Because your diesel produces max hp at lower rpm.
To reach 500 hp on a 4 cyl. engine, we need to rev much higher than that.
That means both engine move roughly the same volume of air per minute.

This man never ceases to amaze me with how he is able to explain stuff in a a way I can understand.

With rpm figured in with the displacement, a a big turbo with lots of cfm in a 2.0L is capable of flowing lots o' exhaust like a large displacement motor. Great counterpoint!

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 11:17 PM
^ what he said..

explained it for me. cuz my redline is like 3500rpms

T-spoon
07-24-2007, 11:28 PM
^ what he said..

explained it for me. cuz my redline is like 3500rpms

Wowza. I hope joo are exaggerating.

Blackcloud
07-24-2007, 11:38 PM
http://www.celicatech.com/gallery/files/1/9/DSC00007.JPG

extremeskillz
07-25-2007, 01:22 AM
Wowza. I hope joo are exaggerating.

No. Hes is not.

As far as i know, the faster you let air in the engine then the faster you want it out. On N/A enigines they rely on back pressure to maintain effient operation. A turbo engine, well, the turbo is basically the muffler at this point and create a lot of heat. So the faster you can get rid of it, the lower the egt.

The STS twin turbo kit for the corvette was designed to be in place of the stock mufflers, eliminating the mufflers themselves as the turbo cancels the sound out by the time the exhaust hits the turbine. Ive seen these installed on a corvette and sweet isn't the work to describe how amazing it is and the sound is awesome.

corvelx
07-25-2007, 07:07 PM
*Does the General Discussion dance*

DarkSideCelica
07-25-2007, 09:05 PM
oh wow... i want it...

Amaymi
07-25-2007, 11:23 PM
4 inch piping would be alright on the small car because on turbo cars the turbo relies on the pressure difference across the turbine wheel to spool. In other words, the greater the difference between the pressure before the turbine and after the turbine the faster, easier, cooler, etc. the turbo will run. On most factory turbo motors like the 3s-gte with stock turbos the amount of (back) pressure between the turbine and exhaust valves in the manifold is usually greater than the amount of boost that the turbo is actually producing.
So say you have 8 psi of back pressure in the manifold and 2psi of pressure in the exhaust system the turbo is going to spool faster than if you had 8 psi of pressure in the manifold and 4 psi in the exhaust. The closer to a vacuum you got on the exhaust side of the turbine the better. This is why its fine to just have a short length of pipe coming off of the turbo and dumping anywhere that wont melt when racing and turbo cars are sooo sensitive to exhaust system changes.

Now to quell the misconception that it is nessacary to run a certain amount of back pressure. That is a myth and incorrect. You want VELOCITY NOT BACK PRESSURE. Back pressure is just a simple way to say pumping losses and pumping loss is ALWAYS bad. The proper velocity in your exhaust system will create low pressure spot behind it that will help "suck" exhaust gases out of the next cylinder that opens its exhaust valves. The reason going to big on your exhaust looses power is because when you go to big for a given N/A motor it causes the exhaust gas to be sluggish and have low velocity. The perfect exhaust system would have 0 Back pressure and Maximum velocity for the given motor. But the world is not perfect and thats what companies like greedy and hks work to get as close as possible to.

Blackcloud
07-26-2007, 03:56 AM
only 8lbs of boost..

how cute :hehe:

Mr Celica
07-26-2007, 04:06 AM
:hehe: ^ sheesh you love your truck, huh

Mr Celica
07-26-2007, 04:08 AM
4 inch piping would be alright on the small car because on turbo cars the turbo relies on the pressure difference across the turbine wheel to spool. In other words, the greater the difference between the pressure before the turbine and after the turbine the faster, easier, cooler, etc. the turbo will run. On most factory turbo motors like the 3s-gte with stock turbos the amount of (back) pressure between the turbine and exhaust valves in the manifold is usually greater than the amount of boost that the turbo is actually producing.
So say you have 8 psi of back pressure in the manifold and 2psi of pressure in the exhaust system the turbo is going to spool faster than if you had 8 psi of pressure in the manifold and 4 psi in the exhaust. The closer to a vacuum you got on the exhaust side of the turbine the better. This is why its fine to just have a short length of pipe coming off of the turbo and dumping anywhere that wont melt when racing and turbo cars are sooo sensitive to exhaust system changes.

Now to quell the misconception that it is nessacary to run a certain amount of back pressure. That is a myth and incorrect. You want VELOCITY NOT BACK PRESSURE. Back pressure is just a simple way to say pumping losses and pumping loss is ALWAYS bad. The proper velocity in your exhaust system will create low pressure spot behind it that will help "suck" exhaust gases out of the next cylinder that opens its exhaust valves. The reason going to big on your exhaust looses power is because when you go to big for a given N/A motor it causes the exhaust gas to be sluggish and have low velocity. The perfect exhaust system would have 0 Back pressure and Maximum velocity for the given motor. But the world is not perfect and thats what companies like greedy and hks work to get as close as possible to.

well said, i understood it!