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View Full Version : Salt/rust proofing my car



Luis C
02-27-2006, 03:50 PM
Ok, so after being formally unemployed for over 4 years and after raising some funds with the help of a family and a bank loan I will soon be starting a new life in a different city with my own business.

I will be moving to a coastal city where the salty ocean air can and will eat away anything that has any metal in its composition so one way or another I have to find a way to protect my car against rust and salt. We dont get any of the fancy chemichal stuff you guys get in developed countries so I'd love to hear what you do to protect yours.

Thanks

Disco Dan
02-27-2006, 07:53 PM
Talk to the Canadians. They've been doing it for years. Though a lot of them haven't been doing it well. On my visit to PEI I noticed that every car older than about 1998 had rust around the wheel wells (front and rear).

Edit: I wonder if the automotive world could benefit from the discoveries of the culinary world when it comes to rust-proofing...

hobbie2k
03-02-2006, 06:14 AM
Talk to the Canadians. They've been doing it for years. Though a lot of them haven't been doing it well. On my visit to PEI I noticed that every car older than about 1998 had rust around the wheel wells (front and rear).

Edit: I wonder if the automotive world could benefit from the discoveries of the culinary world when it comes to rust-proofing...

Probably, but I'm sure they're expensive. Anyhow, from a guy who lives in Northern Minnesota (I washed my gunmetal colored car 2 days ago and it's already white up to the windows from all the salt on the roads), far and away the best thing to do is keep the car clean.

I would also recommend that you give the whole underside of the car a very good spraying a couple times a year, and make sure that all your drain holes are kept clear and open.

Finally, look for any chipped paint or bare metal (especially around the rocker panels, wheel wells, and underneath) and have those spots cleaned well, touched up (or if they're large repainted with a rust-resistant primer), and perhaps try and keep a thin, but decent undercoating on the car.

The last thing I can suggest is that you just keep an eye on it. After all, no matter how good you take care of your car it will start to rust someday, so if you do notice and bubbling paint or brown showing through, get it fixed asap.

Luis C
03-02-2006, 02:34 PM
What type/brand of undercoating ? If seen people use asphalt and even tar here :|

hobbie2k
03-02-2006, 05:20 PM
What type/brand of undercoating ? If seen people use asphalt and even tar here :|

*shrug* I suppose if you don't have any snow to worry about, and you only drive on clean paved roads, then that same rust-resistant, black primer should do the job. If you do drive on a lot of gravel or broken roads, though, I might use a dedicated undercoating that you should be able to buy at an autoparts store. Unfortunately, it'll be very thick (like tar) and quite heavy, but it'll resist chipping and denting. Just make sure that you don't use it anywhere visible. As far as a specific brand, I have no favorites, and don't even know what is sold there...

Luis C
03-02-2006, 05:47 PM
Not snow but worse... 365 days of salty wind (i'll be living next to the beach)

Adrian Avgerinos
03-04-2006, 06:21 AM
http://waxoyl.com/

That's what we sell at work for the old British cars we sell parts for. Nothing rusts faster than old British junk. That said, this stuff works pretty damn well.

hobbie2k
03-05-2006, 12:19 AM
Not snow but worse... 365 days of salty wind (i'll be living next to the beach)

meh...I used to live next to the ocean (SoCal) and most of the cars there did pretty well when compared to a daily driver in northern minnesota...anyhow, it's not the snow that rusts the cars here...it's the tons of salt that they drop on the roads to keep ice from forming.

Like I said earlier, I'll wash my car and within a hundred miles it's white from all the salt caked to the side...