PDA

View Full Version : wheel selection question 17" or 18" rims



heyman
11-03-2005, 04:19 PM
im wanting to buy a new set of enkei bronze RSV rims. was going with 17" rims and them the guy said that 18" rims would work also. the 17" rims have an offset of 42mm , the 18" rims have an offset of 45mm. i drive on smooth roads. i do travel 10 miles on the interstate at about 80 to 85 mph. but its smooth. ive read that 18" rims on 5th gens , sometimes have rubbing issues. thanks for any help ! Charles

heyman
11-03-2005, 04:19 PM
http://www.enkei.com/Performance%20specs/rsv.html
link to enkei website.

angryyoungnpoor
11-03-2005, 04:29 PM
Go with the 17's. You'll enjoy them a lot more. I was looking at getting the RSV's in Gunmetal. Nice choice. :)

waytooslow
11-03-2005, 04:32 PM
Yeah, 17's would be better.

angryyoungnpoor
11-03-2005, 04:32 PM
I'd also go with the 35 offset. From my knowledge, the lower the offset, the further they stick out.. so then there is no need for spacers. But if you're going for the 18's, go with the higher offset, as you'd probably end up rubbing them.

waytooslow
11-03-2005, 04:37 PM
I don't know about the GT's and stuff, but my ST's rear wheels sit inside the well about 3 frickin inches.. the front ones ain't so bad...point being, you might have to get a different offset for the rear than the front. Just my .02.

angryyoungnpoor
11-03-2005, 04:38 PM
Gt's should be about the same. Gt-s' are even worse, because of the wide body.

waytooslow
11-03-2005, 04:44 PM
So, you think he (or anyone, for that matter) should run with a different offset in the rear?

Galcobar
11-03-2005, 04:51 PM
It's a nice idea to deal with the way the body curves at the rear, compared to the front, but it kind of screws up proper tire rotation.

Spacers, on the other hand, stay on the axle.

As for offset, higher also means closer to the strut, and with a bigger wheel, you have to worry about rubbing on your strut as well as your fender.

Try looking up ricksta's thread on "who thought rims would be such a big deal" -- this issue is discussed approximately every day.

heyman
11-03-2005, 06:26 PM
that thread went sour with some ideal bickering. i think i will go 17". so i should use the 35mm off set all the way around ? or 42mm front and 35mm rear ?

waytooslow
11-03-2005, 06:41 PM
Wouldnt say it went sour at all...if you notice what Galcobar said, running larger offsets in the rear might not be a good thing. I would run the 35's, and use spacers in the rear. Just my opinion.

angryyoungnpoor
11-03-2005, 07:14 PM
No.. you'd want a larger offset and use spacers. I think people misinterpret what offset means.. I really don't know what it means even. The lower number offset, the further out the wheels are from the body. Whereas, the high the offset, the closer they are inside the body.

Slider
11-03-2005, 08:02 PM
I'd go with 35 all around, then maybe buy a small spacer for the rears. This is assuming you're getting the 7" wide rims. Might have to roll your front fenders if you're lowered in the front. I have 45 offset rims but that's because they only came in 45mm.

jjazmin
11-04-2005, 01:56 AM
go with 16's like me!...yessss...

Galcobar
11-06-2005, 12:15 PM
Courtesy 1010tires.com


The offset of a wheel is the distance from the mounting surface of the wheel to the true centerline of the rim. A positive offset means the mounting surface of the wheel is positioned in front of the true centerline of the rim / tire assembly. This in effect brings the tire in to the fender well more. Conversely, a negative offset means the mounting surface of the wheel is behind the true centerline of the rim / tire assembly. This will cause the tire to stick out away from the vehicle.

http://www.1010tires.com/images/WheelOffset.jpg

And to figure out what kind of effect a different offset will have on the wheel + car combo: http://www.1010tires.com/WheelOffsetCalculator.asp

A spacer, which attaches to the hub of the car, pushes the mounting surface of the wheel farther out from the centre of the car. That pushes the entire wheel towards the fenders. A lower positive offset will push the rim out farther, but the mounting surface stays in the same place.

To keep it straight, think about offset's positive/negative as relative to your fender. Higher the number, the farther away the wheel will be from your fender.